Tag - CDM Client Advisor

Tower Works, PRS Scheme Leeds, CDM Advisor, Principal Designer, CDM

Safer Sphere appointed on Tower Works Scheme

Safer Sphere is delighted to reveal that we have been appointed on the new Tower Works PRS scheme in Leeds. This new build project will see the construction of 245 apartments set within the distinctive waterside development. One major aim of the project is to combine the iconic buildings of the area with the new neighbourhood to offer ‘landmark living’. Safer Sphere is acting as CDM Client Advisors to Ask Real Estate on the development which starts on site next month.

CDM Advisor, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safet, ITV Lowry Outlet

Safer Sphere appointed on ITV leisure scheme

Safer Sphere is delighted to reveal that we are working on the new ITV leisure attraction at the Lowry Outlet. The attraction will be the first of its kind and is due to be completed next year.

The strategic partnership with ITV is part of a wider masterplan and £26m regeneration of the Lowry into a leading leisure and retail destination that will also see the opening of a new waterside dining concept in 2020.

Safer Sphere is supporting the project in the roles of CDM Client Advisor to Peel Land and Property throughout the project and Principal Designer Advisors to Artez Ltd through RIBA stages 1 – 4.

 

Capitol House, Dandara, London CDM, CDM 2015

Safer Sphere appointed on Capitol House development

Safer Sphere is pleased to reveal that we have been appointed on the Capitol House project in London. The development will see the current site transformed into a six-storey building with 84 new residential apartments. Safer Sphere is supporting Dandara on the project in the roles of CDM Client Advisor through RIBA stages 5 – 6. The redevelopment will also deliver basement car parking spaces and cycle spaces alongside private and communal amenity space. Additionally, the development will include associated works to the existing highway and new site access roads, ramps and paths and infrastructure works.

 

City Residence, Liverpool Apartments, CDM, Principal Designer, safety Liverpool

Safer Sphere appointed on City Residence Phase 2

Safer Sphere delighted to have been appointed on the new City Residence Phase 2 project which will see the development of 80 residential apartments on Heriot Street in Liverpool. The development follows the award-winning first phase which won ‘Best Small New Home Development’ last year. Safer Sphere will be supporting Evolve Project Consultancy  and Newregen Ltd in the roles of Principal Designer and CDM Client Advisor.

Free CDM Training, London CDM, Free Training

Safer Sphere hosts free CDM Seminar in London

Safer Sphere is pleased to announce that we are hosting a free CDM Overview training seminar to delegates who would benefit from gaining a better understanding of regulations and their duties. You will receive a 2-hour Continual Professional Development training session along with an attendance certificate and supporting guidance packs.

Whether you are a Designer, Architect, Contractor, Principal Designer or the project client, let us help make discharging your duties easier to understand.

The event will take place on the 2nd September at the Grange Wellington Hotel in Westminster.

To reserve your space on the event, please click here.

 

CDM Advisor, Principal Designer Advisor, Hospital, Health and Safety

Safer Sphere appointed on Calderdale lifecycle project

Safer Sphere has worked on multiple hospital projects both big and small, and we love to share these projects with our page followers. We are delighted to have been appointed on a lifecycle painting project at Calderdale Royal Hospital which involves painting and floor replacements within live hospital wards, offices and communal areas. Safer Sphere is acting as Principal Designer Advisor and CDM Client Advisor to ENGIE.

Welding Health & Safety

Welding Fumes, LEV and Suitable RPE

If you are looking for advice about welding fumes and the suitable PPE to wear it can be difficult to offer advice for every time someone welds something. The advice that you will find below will help you understand which steps you should take so the work environment is safe for your employees.

Ventilation Considerations

Do you need to ensure your workers are using a filtering face mask and that they have additional ventilation along with fume extraction? If you offer any or all of these options it’s vital that you ensure they are used correctly.

  • When local exhaust ventilation (LEV) is used correctly the quality of the welds are not affected. You may need to provide all of your welders with the correct type of respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
  • If your welders are undertaking short jobs FFP3 masks offer a good amount of protection and they tend to be quite cheap. Please note that you will have to purchase different sized dust masks as the same mask will not fit everyone.
  • Powered filtering welding visors can be used when your welders are working for more than 2 hours. Additionally, they can also be used when it’s not viable to use extraction.

Eye and Face Protection

Your team should wear a helmet that comes with a filter lens and a cover plate. Hand shields need to protect the neck and face, forehead and ears. Approved safety glasses that come with side shields or goggles should be worn under the helmet.

Safety shields or goggles should provide protection from slag chips, flying metal and other hazards.

Head and Ear Protection

A fire-resistant welder’s cap or another form of head covering needs to be worn by your workers. This will protect their head and hair from radiation, splatter, flying sparks and burns.

When working over head or out of position ear muffs or plugs should be provided. If there is loud noise then approved muffs or ear plugs should be provided.

Body Protection

Clothes that are oil-free and that allow freedom of movement should be worn. Long sleeved shirts and buttoned cuffs will help to protect the arms and neck from radiation.

Foot Protection

Steel toe, leather, high-topped boots that are in good condition need to be worn. If your welders are working in slag or heavy spark areas leather spats should be strapped around their legs and the tops of boots to prevent burns and injury.

Hand Protection

Welding gloves that are dry and free from holes should be provided. The gloves should be flame-resistant and provide general hand protection.

Minimising Fumes

One of the first steps you need to take is to determine if the job can be altered so that there is less welding, cutting and gouging involved. Excessive currents and long-duty cycles can produce a lot more fumes along with affecting the quality of the weld. Are your team using the optimum settings? You should also determine if you can use a welding technique that creates fewer fumes. Can you use TIG (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) instead as it produces a smaller amount of fumes?

Shielding Gas

Has your shielding gas been optimised? Doing so could result in the lowest emission of fumes. You should also bear in mind that the best gas for the work that your welders do may not be the cheapest. If you’re worried about the cost please note that the cost of the gases can be offset by the savings you have in terms of labour costs thanks to an increased speed in production.

Removing Surface Platings

Check to see if you’re able to remove surface platings, paint, dirt and oil. These substances typically increase the fumes and could on occasion may them toxic. Please note that hot work on chromate or lead paints and cadmium plating is very hazardous.

Changing The Environment

Can you change the environment so the welder does not have to breathe in the fume cloud?

Can you:

  • Give them more space to work?
  • Provide turntables and other pieces of equipment so the workpiece can be manipulated?
  • Plan the welding sequence differently?

If your welders can work with their head out of the rising fumes they will breathe less in. Fewer fumes equals a lot less risk.

Fume Control System

It’s crucial that you ensure the fume control systems are all working correctly. You need to:

  • Carry out maintenance on your non-disposable RPE and your fume-extraction equipment.
  • Check that you have no common faults such as faulty valves, blocked filters, or crushed or split ductwork.
  • Ensure that your fume extraction systems are examined thoroughly by a competent individual at least every 12 to 14 months. Please note this is a legal requirement.

You need to check that any non-disposable welding visors or filtering masks are in good condition. While there is no specific time period set for these checks you should set a schedule.

Take into account the recommendations set by the manufacturers, where the respirator is used and how much they are used. Checks every 4 weeks is normal practice. However, respirators used a lot less often need to be checked every 3 months.

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

University, Whythenshawe, CDM, Prinicpal Designer

Safer Sphere appointed on Timpson University project

Safer Sphere is pleased to have been appointed on the new training facility project at Timpson University in Wythenshawe. The project will see the demolition of the existing training facility on the campus and the construction of a new training facility in its place. We look forward to supporting the project in the roles of CDM Client Advisor to Timpson University and Prinicpal Designer Advisor to Recom on the project.

Lowry Outlet Development, CDM, Principal Designer

Safer Sphere appointed on Lowry Outlet waterfront scheme

Safer Sphere is pleased to support Peel Land and Property Group and Artez on the Lowry Outlet waterfront development. The project will see the development of restaurants and leisure facilities including a new cinema. The scheme known as ‘Watergardens’ will transform the Quays and has been designed to reflect the area’s history as well as its contemporary inhabitants, offering a vibrant dining offering with the best waterfront views in the area, as well as a host of quality retail and leisure spaces. The £26m project is already underway with completion set for 2020.

Asbestos in work

Asbestos in Work

This article follows on from our previous blog post, Asbestos the silent killer

Asbestos is the UK’s biggest cause of work-related deaths. In fact, Asbestos has claimed the lives of 50,000+ people in the last 3 decades. While Asbestos can take some time to develop it can cause Mesothelioma, asbestos is and lung cancer. These diseases don’t just affect workers, they can also affect their families if they have inadvertently come into contact with it.

It can take up to 30 years for someone to show symptoms of Mesothelioma and the other diseases that Asbestos can cause. This is why it’s often hard to work out what is causing the symptoms. Some people may not have realised they were working in a building that contained Asbestos or even realised that they had come into contact with Asbestos. This is usually why many people are shocked that they are suffering from Mesothelioma, asbestos is or lung cancer.

What Exactly is Asbestos?

Asbestos is a mineral that was once quite widely used during the 1960s and 1970s. The reason behind its use comes down to the fact that it was considered to be a very versatile material in the building industry. While the use of Asbestos has been banned for many years it can still be found in some buildings. This is because some older buildings still stand and are considered to be structurally safe. While many old buildings have been torn down and replaced with something new, there are still old ones located all over the UK that contain Asbestos.

This material was once used in shipbuilding, insulation, textiles and fireproofing. Unfortunately, this means that thousands of people who worked in these industries were potentially exposed to it.

The Risk of Exposure Today

As we have already seen, Asbestos is no longer used due to its disease-causing properties. However, there is still a risk of exposure, especially in the construction industry. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) advice on Asbestos is that there is still a high risk of exposure to people with certain job roles, in particular, those work as:

  • Carpenters
  • Construction Worker
  • Computer installation engineers
  • Demolition workers
  • Electricians
  • Fire and burglar alarm installers
  • Gas Fitters
  • General maintenance workers
  • Heating and ventilating engineers
  • Painters and Decorators
  • Plasterers
  • Plumbers
  • Roofing Contractors
  • Telephone engineers
  • Architects, Building Surveyors and other such professsionals

How Can Workers Stay Safe?

In our last blog on Asbestos, we looked at the training required to deal with the discovery of the substance along with what to do if Asbestos is uncovered. Here we look at the regulations that mean that the duty holder needs to manage workers’ exposure to Asbestos.

On non-domestic premises, under the regulations the duty holder must by law:

  • Identify materials that may contain Asbestos
  • Keep up to date records about the Asbestos
  • Assess the risk of exposure
  • Plan how any risks will be managed
  • Inform anyone who may work on the building
  • Inform anyone who may disturb the Asbestos

The Health and Safety Executive has an ‘Asbestos Licensing Unit’ that regulates every company who is working with Asbestos and grants them a licence to carry out any required work.

Asbestos Management Plans

If Asbestos is found to be present, then as the employer you should provide workers with a ‘management plan’ by law. This managment plan should identify the type of Asbestos that has been found, along with the type and level of exposure employees are likely to deal with. The plan will also cover how you plan to eliminate or reduce the exposure and how as the employer you intend to monitor the exposure of your employees.

As the employer i.e. Principal Contractor on a project, you should provide full and complete training along with any relevant information to employees that could be at risk of exposure.

Removing Asbestos

No attempts should ever be made to remove Asbestos unless you have a refurbishment and demolition survey in place. The survey will determine whether the asbestos removal will require a licensed contractor to remove. If so, prior to any removal an asb5 notification should be submitted to the HSE prior to carrying out the works. If the works are non licensed non-notifiable then appropriate removal training should have been received.

Once removal has taken place on the building the duty holder should keep all removal records for 40 years. From this, an updated management plan should be in place to reflect the items removed from the building and those that remain.

Suspected Exposure

There is always a risk when working with older buildings of Asbestos exposure, but employers can minimise the risks by putting in place work plans, appropriate PPE, Face-Fit Testing and the appropriate training. Effective communication of the dangers is key so that workers can carry out their roles with safety in mind and employers will be safe in the knowledge that they are doing everything they can to protect their team.

Asbestos Awareness Training

There is no legal requirement to repeat formal refresher awareness training every 12 months however, some form of refresher awareness as necessary, this may include e-learning or as part of other health and safety updates. If you require asbestos awareness training refresher our accredited e-learning asbestos awareness courses could be the solution. It provides an economical solution to your training needs and can fit around you and your business. For more information please see our training page.

 

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.