Tag - CDM Client Advisor

St Helens, Pride of St Helens, Awards, Health and Safety, CDM

Safer Sphere named finalist in the Pride of St Helens Business Awards

Safer Sphere is delighted to reveal that we have made the final of the Pride of St Helens Business Awards in the tough category of Small Business of the Year. This comes fresh off the back of the company’s win at the National Association for Project Safety (APS) awards where the business was crowned CDM Consultant of the year.

The Pride of St Helens Business Awards are a celebration of local businesses and what theses business bring to the town.

Mike Forsyth, Managing Director, Safer Sphere said “We are delighted to have made the final of the Pride of St Helens Business Awards and as a St Helens based growing company, we feel it really highlights the positive impact all the businesses in the final are making to the local economy. All our team are either from St Helens or the local area and this recognition of the business is down to them and hard work they put in.”

The awards take place on Thursday 15th November at the Totally Wicked Stadium.

Safer Sphere appointed on Wilmslow residential project

Safer Sphere is pleased to be working on a residential property build on Knutsford Road in Wilmslow. We are providing CDM Client Advisor support to Property Alliance Group and Principal Designer Advisor support to Alderley Edge Building Company during the construction phase. We are also delighted to be working on the project with Cube Architects.

Health and safety, Safer Sphere

HSE to target construction firms in new health inspections

The HSE has announced this month that Construction firms across Great Britain will be targeted on their health standards by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

These inspections will be the first time the regulator has targeted the industry with a specific focus on respiratory risks and occupational lung disease, looking at the measures businesses have in place to protect their workers’ lungs from the likes of asbestos, silica and wood dust.

Inspectors will be visiting construction businesses and sites across the country throughout October and will specifically be looking for evidence of construction workers knowing the risks, planning their work and using the right controls, and if necessary will use enforcement to ensure people are protected.

HSE’s Peter Baker, chief inspector of construction, said: “Around 100 times as many workers die from diseases caused or made worse by their work than are killed in construction accidents. Annually, work-related cancers, mainly linked to asbestos and silica, are estimated to kill 3,500 people from the industry. Thousands of others suffer life-changing illnesses from their work. Not all lung diseases take years to develop. Some, like acute silicosis or occupational asthma, can occur more quickly.

“As a result, we’ve launched this inspection initiative to find out what exactly businesses in the construction industry are doing today to protect their workers’ health, particularly when it comes to exposure to dust and damage to lungs.

“We want construction workers to be aware of the risks associated with the activities they carry out on a daily basis; be conscious of the fact their work may create hazardous dust; and consider how this could affect their health, in some cases irreversibly. We want businesses and their workers to think of the job from start to finish and avoid creating dust or disturbing asbestos by working in different ways. We want to see construction firms encouraging their workers to firstly keep the dust down and wear the right mask and clothing.

“Ultimately, we want construction workers’ lungs to be protected from ill health, so they can go home healthy to their families and enjoy long careers in this important industry.”

Safer Sphere, APS Awards, CDM, Manchester

Safer Sphere named CDM Consultant of the Year at National Awards

Construction (Design and Management) specialist, Safer Sphere has won ’CDM Consultant of the Year’ at the National Association of Project Safety (APS) Awards, which recognises excellence in construction health and safety risk management.

The North West based CDM consultancy beat off strong competition from some of the biggest names in the CDM industry to take home the crown at the 2018 APS Awards held in Manchester.

Safer Sphere won the prestigious award based on the CDM services provided to the multi-site Design and Build PRS scheme by Dandara, which sees the development of residential units across Salford, Leeds, and Birmingham. The project delivery is made up of big names such as Sir Robert McAlpine, Galliford Try, and Interserve; Safer Sphere was appointed as Client CDM Advisor and Principal Designer Advisors on the project.

On receiving the award, Mike Forsyth, Managing Director at Safer Sphere said:

We are delighted to have won CDM Consultant of Year at the national APS awards as this is one of the highest accolades we can receive for our business. To make it into the final of these leading industry awards is an achievement but to win just highlights the amazing success for Safer Sphere and its accomplishments. This award is solely down to the efforts and expertise of the team as well as the great support of our clients. The Dandara PRS scheme has been a fantastic scheme to work on and we will continue to work on the scheme having been appointed on the Sweet Street and Chapel Wharf fit-outs, which means we will be seeing the project through from concept to completion. Safer Sphere has one the best CDM delivery teams in the industry and this award is testament to this, I couldn’t be more proud.

Housing, Principal Designer Advisor, CDM Client Advisor

Safer Sphere appointed on new homes development

Safer Sphere has been appointed on the development of 30 new homes set in Ribble Valley known as ’The Warren’ in Hurst Green, Clitheroe. We will be acting as CDM Client Advisor on the Hillcrest Homes development.

The development will provide luxury new homes that complement the highly desirable village setting. The new homes will include 2 bedroom bungalows, 3 bedroom semi-detached homes, 2 and 3 bedroom terraced homes and 4 and 5 bedroom family homes.

 

Angel Meadows, Manchester, Health and Safety, Principal Designer Advisor, CDM

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 4

The excavation continues, and things are progressing steadily on the site. On Ludgate Hill (Plot 5), the first half of the excavation has been backfilled and work is underway to excavate the second half. This should reveal a continuation of the ‘Back of Old Mount St’ cobbles and the properties that bordered them.

Down on Mincing St (Plot 3), the team are busy manually cleaning the various cellars and pavements that have unearthed, along with an almost complete section of ‘Holden St’ (see the previous blog post). Unfortunately, Plot 3 seems to be the most impacted by modern disturbance, particularly on the western side of the site where the archaeology has been damaged if not removed entirely. Despite this, Oxford Archaeology has made great progress with the cellars of the ‘Derby Arms’ pub in the southwest corner of the plot, where they seem to have uncovered a lot of evidence for reshaping and remodelling with plenty of mismatched brickwork indicating where rooms have been altered from their original layout.

Unfortunately, there has not been hoards of bottles and barrels that the team were hoping for (nor a scuttler in sight), but a few interesting finds have turned up. These finds include; advertising signs for cocoa and an aniline dye manufacturer, a mixture of different bottles and vials possibly relating to medicine, shoes, and part of what may be a pram frame. These finds are true parts of history and have really spurred the team despite the sudden downpours and gloomy skies as the weather has taken a turn from when the dig began.

The Oxford Archaeology team have worked really hard in some tough weather conditions, but their enthusiasm and dedication has not once faltered. The team will be recording the findings and will be moving onto the next plots in the next week or so where they hope to unearth more parts of Manchester’s historic ruins

Safer Sphere is acting as Principal Designer Advisor and CDM Client Advisor for the Angel Meadows development.

Angel Meadows, CDM, Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safety

Cocoa Sign

Angel Meadows, CDM, Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safety

Angel Meadows Street Remains

Angel Meadows, CDM, Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safety

Aniline Dye Manufacturer Sign

Angel Meadows, Principal Designer Advisor, CDM, Health and Safety,

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 3

The excavation of Angel Meadows continues, and the team began with the backfilling of Plot 2 on Mincing Street, with the recording completed it was time to fill in the cellars and level off the ground to allow the opening the adjacent Plot 3. According to the historic mapping, Plot 3 contains a similar layout of buildings, centred around courtyards, as we have previously seen elsewhere, with two notable differences; the first is the presence of a named street and the second is that one of the buildings used to be a pub.

The name ‘Holden Street’ appears on our earliest available map of 1831 and is still named as such on the OS map of 1966, although it’s width does appear to fluctuate throughout history and it’s likely no more than a back street in later incarnations (it is not named at all on some of the early 20th Century maps). The excavation has already revealed an area of cobbles in line with where Holden Street should lie, so we should learn quite quickly the extent to which it survives.

Our pub is located in the southwest corner of Plot 3 and is first noted on the OS map of 1850. This initial reference names it as ‘The Derby Arms’ and while later mapping is not as specific, the site is still annotated as a public house on the 1922 edition. The machine excavation is still ongoing and at the time of writing we haven’t broken ground in that part of the site yet, but the team are anticipating a nice big cellar with (hopefully) some lovely old bottles. The excavation of a scuttler gang hideout (as pubs often were) may be wishful thinking, as the building seemingly outlasted the youth gangs. The activities of such gangs had begun to tail off by the turn of the 20th century due to a combination of; increased policing, the implementation of working Lads’ Clubs and the outbreak of the Boer War, and later, the First World War. That being said, a pub is an excellent motivator for archaeologists and not the one the team attend as a reward at the end of the working day!

Over on Ludgate Hill (Plot 5) the team worked very hard to finish the cleaning and have jumped straight onto the recording with another visit from our drone pilot scheduled in order to complete the necessary survey work. With everything running to plan the next stage will be to continue backfilling sometime next week, and after that, opening up the other half to continue the story.

Angel Meadows, Principal Designer Advisor Manchester, CDM, Health and Safety

CDM Client Advisor, Principal Designer Advisor Leeds

Safer Sphere appointed on Royds High School works

Safer Sphere has been appointed on upgrades and maintenance projects at Royds High School, a Leeds City Council school. Safer Sphere will be acting as CDM Client Advisor and Principal Designer Advisor supporting Interserve on the project.

CDM Advisors Leeds

Safer Sphere continue to support Dandara PRS Scheme as CDM Advisors

Safer Sphere was originally appointed as CDM Coordinators by Dandara on a 3500 unit PRS at 5 locations throughout the UK. Under CDM 2015 the role evolved into Client CDM Advisors and Principal Designer Advisors and we have continued to support the project through the building stage. Safer Sphere has now been appointed Principal Designer Advisors and Client Advisors on the Sweet Street and Chapel Wharf fit-out. It will be fantastic for us to see a project through from start to finish and the development and fit-out are due to be completed in 2019.

Angel Meadows, Manchester, CDM, Health and Safety, Principal Designer Advisor

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 2

The Angel Meadows excavation has entered its second week and the team are hard at work finishing the cleaning of the archaeology on Plot 2 (Mincing Street), and the process of recording has started with the completion of a GPS survey and extensive photography. This will be completed later this week with the use of a drone to accurately survey the remains. Cleaning of the structural remains is now being undertaken on Plot 5 (Ludgate Hill), to properly define the features our excavations have revealed there.

Preliminary comparisons between the Plot 2 site and historic mapping are allowing the team to begin the work of understanding how the layout of the dwellings in the area changed over time. The documents available to us show buildings were remodelled and removed, courtyards and alleys were extended, and points of access were changed over a period of 100 years. Evidence can be seen of this on the ground existing in the form of blocked doorways, truncated walls, and areas of more recent building superimposed over older foundations. The reasons for these changes isn’t always immediately clear, but some may relate to the efforts of the social reformers who during the later part of the nineteenth century, were (rightfully) concerned that the dark, squalid, and utterly unsanitary, cramped conditions of the area were contributing to the spread of disease and crime and high mortality rates.

Perhaps the most significant indication of these changes is the addition of later sanitation works. These took the form of proper drainage and toilet blocks, much-needed facilities in ‘The Meadow’ and a response to legislation introduced in the mid-1800’s, making such facilities a legal requirement for existing housing, as well as new buildings. In several examples on site, later structures can be seen and have been built onto and over the old to incorporate these amenities.

It’s a strange thing to portray lavatories as a ‘highlight’ of an archaeological site, but the implementation of basic plumbing is representative of the wider initiative to improve conditions for the working classes in Angel Meadow during the Industrial period. It will be interesting to see what other evidence of the conditions will be found and what the excavation further reveals.

CDM, Angel Meadows, Manchester, Health and Safety