Tag - CDM Services

Safer Sphere turns 7, Safer Sphere Principal Designer, CDM Advisors

Safer Sphere reaches year 7

Safer Sphere is delighted to reach the young old age of 7 today as the business celebrates its 7th year in operation. We cannot believe how far we have come in such a short period of time including watching our team grow, opening more offices, winning numerous awards as well as working on some amazing projects.

A big thank you to our hard-working team and dedicated clients for your support.

Mansafe CDM15

Designing With a Mansafe in Mind

The Construction Industry is worth around £65 Billion (Investment Per Annum) to the UK`s GDP. This is a significant contribution but what is not always appreciated is that the cost of maintaining and repairing the resulting asset base which is approximately around £26 Billion. It is vital for clients to be provided with assets that may be safely (and economically) maintained and repaired, and effort should be expended in the early stages of a project to ensure that design deliberations extend to a consideration of the whole-life requirements of the facility.

The obligation to consider these matters is already enshrined in law, but it is often poorly reflected, and there is a lack of practical guidance. For many clients and designers, the concept of considering and planning for work that will be done on a facility, often long after its construction, represents nothing less than a cultural shift in work attitudes and thinking. The need for safe access for maintenance and repair in the main stems from the interrelated consideration of the statutory responsibilities of those involved, the ever-growing need for containment of cost, the management of risk in a comprehensive way, and corporate social responsibility, which encompasses sustainability. Those with the responsibility for managing the maintenance and repair of facilities are likely to find that the organisations who carry out this work, will in future increasingly demand adequate provision of safe access, or will price extra for suitable mitigating and controlling measures to compensate for shortfalls in provision. They have their own statutory obligations, so it is in everyone’s interest to get it right first time.

A difficult topic to consider is the implementation of a mansafe system, which comes in all sorts of varieties and makes and is usually shown on a concept drawing by an Architect or Designer, but is this correct? Is it too early in the design to show this system and is the Architect the correct person to design this system?

So what is a mansafe system?

Mansafe systems

Personal Fall Prevention Systems are commonly known in the construction industry as ‘mansafe systems’ and are used to keep the operative safe by connecting them to the system using appropriate PPE. The system comprises cable, post and fixings that are tested to take the fall of the user. These usually take the form of a fall arrest system or a fall restraint system.

Some designers don’t always look at the whole picture i.e. the work at height hierarchy (see Fig 1),

Mansafe CDM15

Figure 1

There is PPE in the explanation of the meaning of a mansafe system but looking at the hierarchy system we have instantly jumped a number of steps. There should be a reason for that and when designing any building we have to design with safety in mind and therefore we have to look at these steps before we say yes to a mansafe system. So, imagine we have looked at the design and established we are going to design a mansafe system, what do we know or understand about the system?

There is a wide range of systems out in the market, but is it a one size fits all scenario? No of course not, there are lots of things to take into consideration.

Under CDM 2015 we should only engage competent designers and people who are experienced in the task at hand, and with all design work, there is a number of standards and legal documents to adhere to, but do you know what they are? There are a number of regulations that need to be considered before we put pen to paper, these regulations are:

  • Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015
  • Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
  • Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
  • Working at Height Regulations 2005
  • Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992
  • Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998
  • Provision and use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998
  • PPE Regulation (EU) 2016/425 1stEdition April 2018

And then when we start the design, we need to refer to the following:

  • BS8560:2012 +A1:2018– Codes of practice for the design of buildings incorporating safe work at height
  • BS7883:2005 (soon to be 2019)– Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor systems – System design, installation and inspection – Code of practice
  • BS EN795:1997 & 2012– Personal fall protection equipment — Anchor devices
  • BS8610:2017– Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor systems – Specifications
  • PD CEN/TS 16415:2013– Personal fall protection equipment — Anchor devices — Recommendations for anchor devices for use by more than one person simultaneously
  • BS EN 365:2004– Personal protective equipment against falls from height – General requirements for maintenance, periodic examination, repair, marking and packaging
  • BS8437:2005– Codes of practice for the selection, use and maintenance of fall protection systems and equipment for use in the workplace
  • BS7985:2013– Code of practice for the use of rope access methods for industrial purposes – Recommendations and guidance supplementary to BS ISO 2284
  • IRATA International code of practice for industrial ropeaccess– (Third Edition Published July 2014)

Considerations Associated With Installing a Mansafe System

There is an increasing amount of mansafe systems that are not fit for use when installed and these figures are on the rise. We must recognise that a mansafe system is not just a steel rope that attaches to the roof of a building where an operative can hook on and can walk around the building. So, what do we need to look at in regards to the design for a mansafe system?

A new British Standard is due to be released that will help clarify what is required, this new role will call for a System Designer. Regulation 9 & 10 of the CDM Regulations 2015 call for the following:

Regulation 9 and 10 set out the duties placed on designers. These include the duty to eliminate, reduce or control foreseeable health and safety risks through the design process, such as those that may arise during construction work or in maintaining and using the building once it is built.

System Designer: Person with overall responsibility for the design of the anchor system, including certification and handover documentation. This includes the initial risk assessment. The new BS Standard will be BS7883:2019

Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor systems – System design, installation and inspection – Code of practice

This document will list out more design checks and supporting documents to give full accountability for the designed system.

System design specification:  Output documentation resulting from the design process which specifies the anchor system(s) to be installed, how and where they are to be installed and any criteria necessary for their safe access and use.

System technical file documentation:Supplied to the duty holder on completion of the installation by the system designer, to be retained for future reference for the life of the personal fall protection system(s) installed

When designing the configuration of an anchor system, the system designer should avoid over-complex systems whilst maintaining the appropriate level of safety and which:

  1. Give access to all required areas without the need:
  • to disconnect and reconnect to the system;
  • for adjustable personal fall protection equipment;
  • for anti-pendulum anchor devices, if possible;
  1. requires an increased level of user training, competency and supervision (appropriate training is necessary for all users);
  2. c) uses the appropriate personal fall protection equipment to minimize the fall risk without adding complexity.

Legal Obligations

The system designer should:

  • ensure that the anchor system is designed, assembled and installed so that it is safe and without risks to health at all times when it is being used, maintained or inspected;
  • research and ensure that the testing of the products being used to assemble the anchor system is adequate for the intended application;
  • carry out or arrange for the carrying out of such testing that may be necessary to ensure compatibility between assembled parts of the anchor system;
  • carry out or arrange for the carrying out of such on-site testing that may be necessary to prove the integrity of the base material in which the anchor system is to be installed where such integrity is in doubt;
  • not attempt to design an anchor system without knowing what PFPE is to be connected;
  • take such steps as are necessary to ensure that the duty holder is provided with adequate information about the use for which the anchor system is designed and tested and about any conditions necessary to ensure that it will be safe and without risks to health, including when it is being dismantled or disposed of; and
  • take such steps as are necessary to ensure that the duty holder is provided with all such revisions of information that would otherwise give rise to a risk to health or safety.

As well as the legal obligations the system technical file should contain a variety of details, the system technical file should as a minimum contain:

1          Companies involved and relationship

2          Manufacturers & Supplier List

3          Specification / Scope

4          Access Strategy

5          Risk Assessments

  • Design
  • Installation
  • Inspection

6          Delivery Notes

7          Certificate of Conformities

8          Drawings

9          Product & Component List

10        Method Statements

11        Site Commissioning Documents

12        Quality Control Documents

13        Operating and User Instructions

14        Inspection & Maintenance Information

15        Modifications & Major Repairs

No matter what the project is the design stage is the first opportunity for early prevention and trough good design and provision of suitable access, cleaning, maintenance, and replacement strategy information the cost of future operation and maintenance of a building can be significantly reduced for years to come.

 

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

Liverpool Central Library, CDM, Principal Designer Liverpool, CDM Liverpool

Safer Sphere appointed on Central Library Refurbishment

Safer Sphere is pleased to share our appointment on the interior maintenance project at the Central Library in Liverpool. We have been working on the project over the past few weeks which is due for completion at the end of August.

The project involves refreshing the interior of the Picton Reading Room inside the library and plaster repairs. Safer Sphere is supporting ENGIE on the project in the roles of Principal Designer Advisors and Temporary Works Coordinator.

Allan Briscoe, APS Awards, CDM, Principal Designer Advisor, Member of the year

Allan Briscoe shorlisted for APS award

Safer Sphere is delighted to announce that our very own Allan Briscoe has been shortlisted for the Association for Project Safety ‘Member of the Year’ award at this year’s National APS awards. We couldn’t be prouder of Allan for getting to the final, and we will be a keeping our fingers crossed for the awards next month. Well done Allan!

Capitol House, Dandara, London CDM, CDM 2015

Safer Sphere appointed on Capitol House development

Safer Sphere is pleased to reveal that we have been appointed on the Capitol House project in London. The development will see the current site transformed into a six-storey building with 84 new residential apartments. Safer Sphere is supporting Dandara on the project in the roles of CDM Client Advisor through RIBA stages 5 – 6. The redevelopment will also deliver basement car parking spaces and cycle spaces alongside private and communal amenity space. Additionally, the development will include associated works to the existing highway and new site access roads, ramps and paths and infrastructure works.

 

architect designer using VR

The Age of AI, Can Virtual Reality Aid Design in CDM?

In Construction Design and Management (CDM) the Principal Designer is tasked with managing and monitoring health and safety during the design and planning stages.

The role requires someone who has skills, knowledge, experience and training (SKET) to be able to deliver the role competently.

Part of the difficulty in the job today is that plans are evaluated and reviewed in 2D format with elevations and in sections. While architects are trained over the years to think and be comfortable visualising in this way, not everyone involved in the process, including many clients can do the same and it makes it harder to spot issues, mistakes or safety issues.

Technology such as BIM (Building Information Modelling) and the production of virtual 3D models can change everything. By using BIM models and virtual reality headsets it is possible to walk around a building and find out any flaws at the design stage.

BIM Keeps Design Errors Kept To A Minimum

Currently, flaws in buildings are reviewed with post-occupancy evaluations after people have moved in, lived with the building and encountered problems that need to be rectified. The learnings are carried forward into future design projects so the same mistakes are not made again. With the use of BIM, it is possible that many potential mistakes can be avoided before the building is constructed saving not only money, but enhancing the experience of the building’s occupants from day one by removing niggles, design mistakes, or even major safety issues that would otherwise be missed during the design process. BIM allows the industry to develop a preventive pre-occupancy evaluation methodology rather than one that reacts to mistakes after construction is completed.

A Better Experience For Clients And Designers

BIM is also a much more immersive and engaging way for everyone involved to see the vision of a building, it is a way for it to become ‘real’ and almost tangible before it even exists. This is something especially useful and powerful for clients, but also for designers.

The industry has already been busy developing various BIM software tools and Virtual Reality experiences that allow feedback to be more constructive from users and delivered in a way that can then be used to make important design changes.

For example, clients and designers can view 3D models together look at the same elements in real time, and see important details such as how spaces work in relation to each other, the natural light, the views from different elevations and how the space may be filled. Alongside this, any safety or practical issues can be reviewed. Making these changes in this way saves money for the client and makes projects more profitable for designers, without the need to make emergency changes during a build.

What’s more, the workflow can be shared across a number of different virtual reality devices.
Design software can support VR devices such as Oculus Go making it even more accessible for coordination meetings.

Another advantage for using VR tools is the ability to detect issues at real scale and use headsets to record comments and let the application transcribe it into text which can then be attached to the specific elements in the design. This process feels similar to using other artificial Intelligence (AI) voice tools such as Amazon’s Alexa or Apple’s Siri. All that users need to do is press a button and comment.

With these kinds of AI tools, as soon as issues are identified, a report can be produced in the form of a PDF file. Typically the PDF files can be comprised of an automated mark-up, a saved viewpoint, and a comment on the issue. There will also be a timestamp and a note of who the author was. How these are presented will vary depending on the VR software used by the designers.

Virtual Reality Brings The World Closer Together

AI tools also excel when it comes to receiving feedback. They are able to make the whole process very simple and less time-consuming. Using AI and VR in this sense has proven that it can complement existing coordination tools. It has also been found to deliver great results when working on collaborative projects even with remote external consultants.

AI and BIM can also go beyond the design stage and be used in building maintenance, with detailed models able to help pinpoint issues within the structure and its services.

It’s clear that even though BIM and the use of AI is still not fully evolved and in use in all building projects, the potential is there to change the way designers work and how building plans are developed in the future.

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

Free CDM Training, London CDM, Free Training

Safer Sphere hosts free CDM Seminar in London

Safer Sphere is pleased to announce that we are hosting a free CDM Overview training seminar to delegates who would benefit from gaining a better understanding of regulations and their duties. You will receive a 2-hour Continual Professional Development training session along with an attendance certificate and supporting guidance packs.

Whether you are a Designer, Architect, Contractor, Principal Designer or the project client, let us help make discharging your duties easier to understand.

The event will take place on the 2nd September at the Grange Wellington Hotel in Westminster.

To reserve your space on the event, please click here.

 

Yorkshire development, Trebor, Principal Designer Advisor, CDM

Safer Sphere appointed on Trebor Industrial units

Safer Sphere is delighted to reveal that we will be supporting Fairhursts Design Group on the Trebor Developments latest industrial build. The project will see the construction of 2  speculative industrial units at the Aero Centre in Yorkshire and Safer Sphere will be supporting the development through RIBA stages 1 – 4 in the role of Principal Designer Advisor. We look forward to seeing the development progress over the coming months.

Jonathan King Safer Sphere, CDM, Principal Designer, Director

Safer Sphere hires new Director

Safer Sphere is pleased to announce that the business has appointed a new Director to assist Managing Director Mike Forsyth with the day to day running of the business.

Jonathan King formerly Head of Safety Management at WYG and Head of Project Safety at Edmond Shipway has been brought into the business to help with its growth strategy from our North West HQ, operating nationally across our three offices.

Jonathan has a wealth of experience in CDM and Construction Health and Safety having worked on projects ranging from £20m to £750m across the UK.

Jonathan said “I am delighted to be joining Safer Sphere, especially at such an exciting time. The business has seen growth year on year and what Mike and the team have achieved in this time has been exceptional. The company has started to get noticed not only in the industry but as a successful business which has been proven by the multiple award wins and nominations and by the key projects the business is working on. I am looking forward to working with Mike and the team and using my knowledge and experience from previous roles, I hope to help the business grow and further succeed.”

Mike Forsyth, Managing Director, Safer Sphere said “We are delighted to have Jonathan on board with us. He is an excellent fit for our business and brings with him the knowledge, experience as well as the skill set to help us achieve our growth and office expansion plans. Jonathan will not only be assisting me with the day to day running of the business but will also be hands-on to support our clients with discharging their CDM duties. We have seen a period of change and growth for the business from winning prestigious awards to implementing new systems. We are always striving for improvements as a business and for our clients and we want to ensure that we step up to mark as a leader in construction health and safety.”

Employer of the year, St Helens Chamber Business Awards, CDM, St Helens Health and safety, Business Awards

Safer Sphere makes final of St Helens Chamber Business Awards

Safer Sphere is delighted to have made it into the final of the St Helens Chamber Business Awards in the tough category of ‘Employer of the Year’. The St Helens Chamber Business Awards are a celebration of local business and the winners in category go forward to compete in the National Chamber Awards which is a massive opportunity.

Mike Forsyth, Managing Director, Safer Sphere said “We are absolutely thrilled to have made the final of the St Helens Chamber Business Awards in the competitive category of ‘Employer of the Year’. This category, in particular, means a lot to us as a business as it is our people that make our business and we want to keep and attract the best talent to so that we continue to grow. To win the employer of the year would not only be a great accolade for the company but would help us to gain the best talent for our business.”

The St Helens Chamber Business Awards takes place on Thursday 16th May at the Totally Wicked Stadium.