Tag - CDM Services Manchester

Safer Sphere are the leading supplier of CDM services in Manchester and across the North West

Mansafe CDM15

Designing With a Mansafe in Mind

The Construction Industry is worth around £65 Billion (Investment Per Annum) to the UK`s GDP. This is a significant contribution but what is not always appreciated is that the cost of maintaining and repairing the resulting asset base which is approximately around £26 Billion. It is vital for clients to be provided with assets that may be safely (and economically) maintained and repaired, and effort should be expended in the early stages of a project to ensure that design deliberations extend to a consideration of the whole-life requirements of the facility.

The obligation to consider these matters is already enshrined in law, but it is often poorly reflected, and there is a lack of practical guidance. For many clients and designers, the concept of considering and planning for work that will be done on a facility, often long after its construction, represents nothing less than a cultural shift in work attitudes and thinking. The need for safe access for maintenance and repair in the main stems from the interrelated consideration of the statutory responsibilities of those involved, the ever-growing need for containment of cost, the management of risk in a comprehensive way, and corporate social responsibility, which encompasses sustainability. Those with the responsibility for managing the maintenance and repair of facilities are likely to find that the organisations who carry out this work, will in future increasingly demand adequate provision of safe access, or will price extra for suitable mitigating and controlling measures to compensate for shortfalls in provision. They have their own statutory obligations, so it is in everyone’s interest to get it right first time.

A difficult topic to consider is the implementation of a mansafe system, which comes in all sorts of varieties and makes and is usually shown on a concept drawing by an Architect or Designer, but is this correct? Is it too early in the design to show this system and is the Architect the correct person to design this system?

So what is a mansafe system?

Mansafe systems

Personal Fall Prevention Systems are commonly known in the construction industry as ‘mansafe systems’ and are used to keep the operative safe by connecting them to the system using appropriate PPE. The system comprises cable, post and fixings that are tested to take the fall of the user. These usually take the form of a fall arrest system or a fall restraint system.

Some designers don’t always look at the whole picture i.e. the work at height hierarchy (see Fig 1),

Mansafe CDM15

Figure 1

There is PPE in the explanation of the meaning of a mansafe system but looking at the hierarchy system we have instantly jumped a number of steps. There should be a reason for that and when designing any building we have to design with safety in mind and therefore we have to look at these steps before we say yes to a mansafe system. So, imagine we have looked at the design and established we are going to design a mansafe system, what do we know or understand about the system?

There is a wide range of systems out in the market, but is it a one size fits all scenario? No of course not, there are lots of things to take into consideration.

Under CDM 2015 we should only engage competent designers and people who are experienced in the task at hand, and with all design work, there is a number of standards and legal documents to adhere to, but do you know what they are? There are a number of regulations that need to be considered before we put pen to paper, these regulations are:

  • Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015
  • Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999
  • Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
  • Working at Height Regulations 2005
  • Workplace (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992
  • Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998
  • Provision and use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998
  • PPE Regulation (EU) 2016/425 1stEdition April 2018

And then when we start the design, we need to refer to the following:

  • BS8560:2012 +A1:2018– Codes of practice for the design of buildings incorporating safe work at height
  • BS7883:2005 (soon to be 2019)– Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor systems – System design, installation and inspection – Code of practice
  • BS EN795:1997 & 2012– Personal fall protection equipment — Anchor devices
  • BS8610:2017– Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor systems – Specifications
  • PD CEN/TS 16415:2013– Personal fall protection equipment — Anchor devices — Recommendations for anchor devices for use by more than one person simultaneously
  • BS EN 365:2004– Personal protective equipment against falls from height – General requirements for maintenance, periodic examination, repair, marking and packaging
  • BS8437:2005– Codes of practice for the selection, use and maintenance of fall protection systems and equipment for use in the workplace
  • BS7985:2013– Code of practice for the use of rope access methods for industrial purposes – Recommendations and guidance supplementary to BS ISO 2284
  • IRATA International code of practice for industrial ropeaccess– (Third Edition Published July 2014)

Considerations Associated With Installing a Mansafe System

There is an increasing amount of mansafe systems that are not fit for use when installed and these figures are on the rise. We must recognise that a mansafe system is not just a steel rope that attaches to the roof of a building where an operative can hook on and can walk around the building. So, what do we need to look at in regards to the design for a mansafe system?

A new British Standard is due to be released that will help clarify what is required, this new role will call for a System Designer. Regulation 9 & 10 of the CDM Regulations 2015 call for the following:

Regulation 9 and 10 set out the duties placed on designers. These include the duty to eliminate, reduce or control foreseeable health and safety risks through the design process, such as those that may arise during construction work or in maintaining and using the building once it is built.

System Designer: Person with overall responsibility for the design of the anchor system, including certification and handover documentation. This includes the initial risk assessment. The new BS Standard will be BS7883:2019

Personal fall protection equipment – Anchor systems – System design, installation and inspection – Code of practice

This document will list out more design checks and supporting documents to give full accountability for the designed system.

System design specification:  Output documentation resulting from the design process which specifies the anchor system(s) to be installed, how and where they are to be installed and any criteria necessary for their safe access and use.

System technical file documentation:Supplied to the duty holder on completion of the installation by the system designer, to be retained for future reference for the life of the personal fall protection system(s) installed

When designing the configuration of an anchor system, the system designer should avoid over-complex systems whilst maintaining the appropriate level of safety and which:

  1. Give access to all required areas without the need:
  • to disconnect and reconnect to the system;
  • for adjustable personal fall protection equipment;
  • for anti-pendulum anchor devices, if possible;
  1. requires an increased level of user training, competency and supervision (appropriate training is necessary for all users);
  2. c) uses the appropriate personal fall protection equipment to minimize the fall risk without adding complexity.

Legal Obligations

The system designer should:

  • ensure that the anchor system is designed, assembled and installed so that it is safe and without risks to health at all times when it is being used, maintained or inspected;
  • research and ensure that the testing of the products being used to assemble the anchor system is adequate for the intended application;
  • carry out or arrange for the carrying out of such testing that may be necessary to ensure compatibility between assembled parts of the anchor system;
  • carry out or arrange for the carrying out of such on-site testing that may be necessary to prove the integrity of the base material in which the anchor system is to be installed where such integrity is in doubt;
  • not attempt to design an anchor system without knowing what PFPE is to be connected;
  • take such steps as are necessary to ensure that the duty holder is provided with adequate information about the use for which the anchor system is designed and tested and about any conditions necessary to ensure that it will be safe and without risks to health, including when it is being dismantled or disposed of; and
  • take such steps as are necessary to ensure that the duty holder is provided with all such revisions of information that would otherwise give rise to a risk to health or safety.

As well as the legal obligations the system technical file should contain a variety of details, the system technical file should as a minimum contain:

1          Companies involved and relationship

2          Manufacturers & Supplier List

3          Specification / Scope

4          Access Strategy

5          Risk Assessments

  • Design
  • Installation
  • Inspection

6          Delivery Notes

7          Certificate of Conformities

8          Drawings

9          Product & Component List

10        Method Statements

11        Site Commissioning Documents

12        Quality Control Documents

13        Operating and User Instructions

14        Inspection & Maintenance Information

15        Modifications & Major Repairs

No matter what the project is the design stage is the first opportunity for early prevention and trough good design and provision of suitable access, cleaning, maintenance, and replacement strategy information the cost of future operation and maintenance of a building can be significantly reduced for years to come.

 

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

CDM Manchester, Principal Designer, 79 Mosley Street

Safer Sphere appointed on 79 Mosley Street

Safer Shere is pleased to continue our support at Mosley Street with a new alterations project at 79 Mosley Street, Manchester. We will be acting as Client CDM Advisor on behalf of the client and Prinicpal Designer Advisor to OBI on the project

Safer Sphere appointed on I’m a celeb leisure attraction

We reported 2 months ago that we were involved in the new ITV leisure attraction at the Lowry Outlet. We are delighted to now reveal that the project is the first ‘I’m A Celebrity Jungle Challenge’ attraction. Safer Sphere has been supporting the project in the role of CDM Client Advisors to Peel Land & Property and Principal Designer Advisors to Artez Ltd through RIBA stages 1 – 4.

Peel Land & Property and ITV said:

ITV has today confirmed a new multi-million pound entertainment attraction, celebrating TV blockbuster I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here! will open at The Lowry’s brand new The Watergardens development at MediaCityUK.

The I’m A Celebrity… Jungle Challenge will open later next year as an epic 2500 square metre indoor entertainment feature in Manchester, featuring the iconic Base Camp, Croc Creek and Snake Rock in the ultimate jungle encounter.

The action-packed family entertainment centre promises to take camp mates into the heart of the jungle where you’ll need to navigate a series of obstacles and challenges. Face your fears, test your nerve and agility and venture into the jungle canopy, collecting stars as you go to be crowned king or queen of the jungle!

James Penfold, Controller of Partnerships for ITV said: “The I’m A Celebrity… Jungle Challenge is a one of a kind, multi-sensory adrenaline adventure. It brings together the heart and soul of the hugely celebrated series, and ITV’s expertise in curating fantastic, memorable live brand experiences as a great example of our More than TV strategy.”

Jason Pullen, Managing Director of Lifestyle Outlets added: “Our partnership with ITV is an exciting development in our goal to create a new generation of Outlets by creating unique leisure and shopping destinations with entertainment at their heart.  I am delighted to reveal that “I’m A Celebrity… Jungle Challenge“ opening at The Watergardens, MediaCityUK next year will be the first of its kind in the UK. I am confident that the experience will be a huge draw for people across the North West and beyond as they look to get closer to the action of this iconic TV show”

Today’s announcement is the next exciting chapter in ITV’s expanding portfolio of live events, tours and attractions, which includes Coronation Street The Tour, Emmerdale Village Tour, Emmerdale Studio Experience and the more recently announced, ITV Daytime Studios Tour at Television Centre in London.

Work to transform the space into the thrilling jungle experience is expected to start early 2020 and will open later in the year. Visitors can expect a 90minute action packed challenge through jungle ziplines, parachute drops and vertical climbing walls; the perfect day out for all the family!

Source: https://peellandp.co.uk/news-blog/2019/10/3/itv-to-open-im-a-celebrity-jungle-challenge-in-manchester-next-year

 

Occupational Health and CDM15

Occupational Health in the Construction Industry

The construction industry can be viewed as a high-risk industry. Although only 7% of employed people work in this sector, last year it was estimated that there were 82,000 work-related ill-health cases in the construction industry, 62% was musculoskeletal disorders (MSD’S) and 25% were stress, anxiety or depression related (HSE 2017/2018 statistics).

Those who work in construction are also more likely to face long term health issues and each year, around 3,000 workers in construction suffer from breathing and lung problems they believe

were caused or made worse by their work in construction.

 

Smaller Construction Sites

In April 2015 the CDM regulations were updated with a key objective to improve worker protection and improve health and safety standards on smaller construction sites and domestic projects were statistically most injuries, illness and fatalities occur.

For health and safety practitioners in construction, it is important to make sure that information about hazards, risks and risk mitigation measures is clearly conveyed taking into account the audience and making sure that key information is not obscured.  For example, highlighting hazards on layout plans.

When advising clients, designers and contractors, the approach must be proportionate otherwise advice is likely to be missed or ignored.

The focus should be on identifying, designing out and managing issues (especially relating to health) that are not likely to be obvious, are unusual or difficult to manage effectively.  This is especially true on smaller projects where there is likely to be less awareness of health issues in general.

 

Ill Health

Occupational health is a very important issue for those who work in construction and the sector as a whole. Last year there were 51,000 work-related musculoskeletal injuries and 3,000 who suffer from breathing and lung issue.

Health and safety consultants have an important role to play in raising awareness of less obvious health issues to consider.  Long-term ill health issues are often overlooked with the focus on more immediate safety issues. Greater focus is required from the outset of projects to consider health issues in the design and planning stages of projects.

The HSE has rolled out numerous initiatives to combat illness in the workplace including their #Workright and #Dustbuster campaigns. These initiatives help to raise awareness of the issues and highlight the importance of considering and avoiding work-related ill-health including lung disease, MSDs and stress.

 

Disease in the Construction Industry

One of the biggest causes of disease in the industry is exposure to dust. ‘Dust’ includes wood dust, crystalline silica and other components. The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH) cover activities which may expose workers to construction dust.

There are three key things you need to do:

  • Assess (the risks)
  • Control (the risks)
  • Review (the controls).

The products, activities and risks associated with dust must be tackled at all levels of a project.

Designers should specify products and processes to minimise the requirement for on-site cutting, scabbling and other activities that will generate dust on site.  Can services be surface mounted rather than cutting channels? Can regular-shaped paving be used to reduce the need for cutting on-site?

Those who manufacture and supply tools and materials have a key role in making changes to the industry too. For example building in dust extract and damping into equipment likely to generate dust.

There is industry-wide recognition of the risks of asbestos with specific legislation being put in place to ban and manage asbestos.  Similar risks are posed by silica dust e.g. from cutting block paving but are less widely known.

 

Mental Health in the Construction Industry

It is not just physical health issues that are affecting people who work in construction but mental health plays a massive part in health and safety. Last year there was an estimated 14,000 work-related cases of stress, depression or anxiety (new or long-standing) which equates to one-sixth of all ill health in the construction industry.

Suicide is still the single biggest killer of men under the age of 45 and as the construction industry is predominantly male then there is a high-risk factor of stress and depression. The industry is well known for being highly stressful with risk to injury, long hours, often working away from home and of course, job security being some of the main pressure points.

It is known that certain job types come attached to stigma and unfortunately, this has led to construction workers, again predominately men not being able to talk about how they are feeling and bottling it up due them not wanting to appear weak.

There is a lot of work still to do in the industry to try and cut through this stigma and encourage workers to talk. When putting together an occupational health strategy, wellbeing should also be taken into account, especially when it comes to mental health. As an employer good communication with the workforce on health, safety and wellbeing is key and there are things that can be done to help alleviate stress in the workplace such as regular breaks and support from colleagues and management. Encouraging workers to talk about potential problems before they become a wider issue should be widely encouraged too, for example, if there is a staff shortage causing a worker to work longer hours, which in turn is causing tiredness and stress then this should be discussed and the worker should feel comfortable addressing this with the employers support.

For support and guidance on putting together an occupational health policy for your business then get in touch with us today.

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

CDM Advisor, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safet, ITV Lowry Outlet

Safer Sphere appointed on ITV leisure scheme

Safer Sphere is delighted to reveal that we are working on the new ITV leisure attraction at the Lowry Outlet. The attraction will be the first of its kind and is due to be completed next year.

The strategic partnership with ITV is part of a wider masterplan and £26m regeneration of the Lowry into a leading leisure and retail destination that will also see the opening of a new waterside dining concept in 2020.

Safer Sphere is supporting the project in the roles of CDM Client Advisor to Peel Land and Property throughout the project and Principal Designer Advisors to Artez Ltd through RIBA stages 1 – 4.

 

architect designer using VR

The Age of AI, Can Virtual Reality Aid Design in CDM?

In Construction Design and Management (CDM) the Principal Designer is tasked with managing and monitoring health and safety during the design and planning stages.

The role requires someone who has skills, knowledge, experience and training (SKET) to be able to deliver the role competently.

Part of the difficulty in the job today is that plans are evaluated and reviewed in 2D format with elevations and in sections. While architects are trained over the years to think and be comfortable visualising in this way, not everyone involved in the process, including many clients can do the same and it makes it harder to spot issues, mistakes or safety issues.

Technology such as BIM (Building Information Modelling) and the production of virtual 3D models can change everything. By using BIM models and virtual reality headsets it is possible to walk around a building and find out any flaws at the design stage.

BIM Keeps Design Errors Kept To A Minimum

Currently, flaws in buildings are reviewed with post-occupancy evaluations after people have moved in, lived with the building and encountered problems that need to be rectified. The learnings are carried forward into future design projects so the same mistakes are not made again. With the use of BIM, it is possible that many potential mistakes can be avoided before the building is constructed saving not only money, but enhancing the experience of the building’s occupants from day one by removing niggles, design mistakes, or even major safety issues that would otherwise be missed during the design process. BIM allows the industry to develop a preventive pre-occupancy evaluation methodology rather than one that reacts to mistakes after construction is completed.

A Better Experience For Clients And Designers

BIM is also a much more immersive and engaging way for everyone involved to see the vision of a building, it is a way for it to become ‘real’ and almost tangible before it even exists. This is something especially useful and powerful for clients, but also for designers.

The industry has already been busy developing various BIM software tools and Virtual Reality experiences that allow feedback to be more constructive from users and delivered in a way that can then be used to make important design changes.

For example, clients and designers can view 3D models together look at the same elements in real time, and see important details such as how spaces work in relation to each other, the natural light, the views from different elevations and how the space may be filled. Alongside this, any safety or practical issues can be reviewed. Making these changes in this way saves money for the client and makes projects more profitable for designers, without the need to make emergency changes during a build.

What’s more, the workflow can be shared across a number of different virtual reality devices.
Design software can support VR devices such as Oculus Go making it even more accessible for coordination meetings.

Another advantage for using VR tools is the ability to detect issues at real scale and use headsets to record comments and let the application transcribe it into text which can then be attached to the specific elements in the design. This process feels similar to using other artificial Intelligence (AI) voice tools such as Amazon’s Alexa or Apple’s Siri. All that users need to do is press a button and comment.

With these kinds of AI tools, as soon as issues are identified, a report can be produced in the form of a PDF file. Typically the PDF files can be comprised of an automated mark-up, a saved viewpoint, and a comment on the issue. There will also be a timestamp and a note of who the author was. How these are presented will vary depending on the VR software used by the designers.

Virtual Reality Brings The World Closer Together

AI tools also excel when it comes to receiving feedback. They are able to make the whole process very simple and less time-consuming. Using AI and VR in this sense has proven that it can complement existing coordination tools. It has also been found to deliver great results when working on collaborative projects even with remote external consultants.

AI and BIM can also go beyond the design stage and be used in building maintenance, with detailed models able to help pinpoint issues within the structure and its services.

It’s clear that even though BIM and the use of AI is still not fully evolved and in use in all building projects, the potential is there to change the way designers work and how building plans are developed in the future.

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

First Street Manchester, Hotel development Manchester, CDM support, CDM Manchester, Princopal Designer Manchester

Safer Sphere appointed on First Street second phase

Back in February, we shared the news of our appointed on the first phase development on First Street, Manchester, and we are delighted to reveal that we are continuing our support on the second stage of the development. Safer Sphere will be supporting the project in the roles of Principal Designer Advisors to Jon Matthews Architects and CDM Client Advisor to Ask Real Estate.

CDM Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, MMU Student Hub

Safer Sphere appointed on MMU Student Hub

Safer Sphere is pleased to see the works start on a series of Manchester Metropolitan University Student Hubs which will transform the student support services. We are delighted to be supporting 5Plus Architects on this project in the role of Principal Designer Advisor.

Welding Health & Safety

Welding Fumes, LEV and Suitable RPE

If you are looking for advice about welding fumes and the suitable PPE to wear it can be difficult to offer advice for every time someone welds something. The advice that you will find below will help you understand which steps you should take so the work environment is safe for your employees.

Ventilation Considerations

Do you need to ensure your workers are using a filtering face mask and that they have additional ventilation along with fume extraction? If you offer any or all of these options it’s vital that you ensure they are used correctly.

  • When local exhaust ventilation (LEV) is used correctly the quality of the welds are not affected. You may need to provide all of your welders with the correct type of respiratory protective equipment (RPE).
  • If your welders are undertaking short jobs FFP3 masks offer a good amount of protection and they tend to be quite cheap. Please note that you will have to purchase different sized dust masks as the same mask will not fit everyone.
  • Powered filtering welding visors can be used when your welders are working for more than 2 hours. Additionally, they can also be used when it’s not viable to use extraction.

Eye and Face Protection

Your team should wear a helmet that comes with a filter lens and a cover plate. Hand shields need to protect the neck and face, forehead and ears. Approved safety glasses that come with side shields or goggles should be worn under the helmet.

Safety shields or goggles should provide protection from slag chips, flying metal and other hazards.

Head and Ear Protection

A fire-resistant welder’s cap or another form of head covering needs to be worn by your workers. This will protect their head and hair from radiation, splatter, flying sparks and burns.

When working over head or out of position ear muffs or plugs should be provided. If there is loud noise then approved muffs or ear plugs should be provided.

Body Protection

Clothes that are oil-free and that allow freedom of movement should be worn. Long sleeved shirts and buttoned cuffs will help to protect the arms and neck from radiation.

Foot Protection

Steel toe, leather, high-topped boots that are in good condition need to be worn. If your welders are working in slag or heavy spark areas leather spats should be strapped around their legs and the tops of boots to prevent burns and injury.

Hand Protection

Welding gloves that are dry and free from holes should be provided. The gloves should be flame-resistant and provide general hand protection.

Minimising Fumes

One of the first steps you need to take is to determine if the job can be altered so that there is less welding, cutting and gouging involved. Excessive currents and long-duty cycles can produce a lot more fumes along with affecting the quality of the weld. Are your team using the optimum settings? You should also determine if you can use a welding technique that creates fewer fumes. Can you use TIG (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) instead as it produces a smaller amount of fumes?

Shielding Gas

Has your shielding gas been optimised? Doing so could result in the lowest emission of fumes. You should also bear in mind that the best gas for the work that your welders do may not be the cheapest. If you’re worried about the cost please note that the cost of the gases can be offset by the savings you have in terms of labour costs thanks to an increased speed in production.

Removing Surface Platings

Check to see if you’re able to remove surface platings, paint, dirt and oil. These substances typically increase the fumes and could on occasion may them toxic. Please note that hot work on chromate or lead paints and cadmium plating is very hazardous.

Changing The Environment

Can you change the environment so the welder does not have to breathe in the fume cloud?

Can you:

  • Give them more space to work?
  • Provide turntables and other pieces of equipment so the workpiece can be manipulated?
  • Plan the welding sequence differently?

If your welders can work with their head out of the rising fumes they will breathe less in. Fewer fumes equals a lot less risk.

Fume Control System

It’s crucial that you ensure the fume control systems are all working correctly. You need to:

  • Carry out maintenance on your non-disposable RPE and your fume-extraction equipment.
  • Check that you have no common faults such as faulty valves, blocked filters, or crushed or split ductwork.
  • Ensure that your fume extraction systems are examined thoroughly by a competent individual at least every 12 to 14 months. Please note this is a legal requirement.

You need to check that any non-disposable welding visors or filtering masks are in good condition. While there is no specific time period set for these checks you should set a schedule.

Take into account the recommendations set by the manufacturers, where the respirator is used and how much they are used. Checks every 4 weeks is normal practice. However, respirators used a lot less often need to be checked every 3 months.

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

Health and Safety Consultant, Grafters awards, St Helens Chamber Business Awards, CDM

Safer Sphere continues award win

Safer Sphere is delighted to announce that we were ‘Highly Commended’ at the St Helens Chamber Business Awards for ‘Employer of the Year’ and took home the award for ‘Best Health and Safety Consultancy’ at the industry North West Grafters awards.

The awards were held at venues in St Helens and Manchester and representatives from the business were on hand to receive the accolades.

We were fortunate to take home the national award last year for ‘CDM Consultant of the Year’ and we to continue to take home more accolades demonstrating the businesses continued growth and presence in the industry and beyond.

Mike Forsyth, Managing Director, Safer Sphere said “We were in a fortunate position to be up for two separate awards with two different award bodies on the same evening, which was a nice situation to be in. We are delighted to take home Best Health and Safety Consultancy at the Grafters as the award describes exactly what we do and what we are all about as a business. It was also an honour to be highly commended for Employer of the Year at the Chamber awards, as it is our people who make our business great. We never take anything for granted and all recognition is truly appreciated and reaffirms that we are doing well as a business.”