Articles about all aspects of CDM 15 regulations.

construction phase plan

What is in a construction phase plan?

A Construction Phase Plan is required for every construction project. When appointed by a client, this plan is provided by the contractor, or, where there is more than one contractor, the Principal Contractor, before the construction phase begins. It should be displayed clearly and should be made available to site workers or any visitors. It is created from the information provided by the client during the pre-construction stage and includes any information provided by the Principal Designer.

When implemented, it should go through several revisions throughout the life of a construction project. As time progresses during the construction phase, this health and safety plan will change. A Construction Phase Plan is a legal requirement as part of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015), even if you work for a domestic client and even if there is only one contractor on site, the plan must remain up to date and valid. The project may even need to be notified to the HSE, if it is will last 500 person days or 30 working days with more than 20 operatives. Safer Sphere can advise you on preparing and managing this aspect through the construction phase.

The significant hazards on a construction site can be many and varied, it is a legal requirement that all workers on site are told about these hazards and how the hazards are being controlled, the Construction Phase Plan is how the information is initially communicated to sub-contractors, workers and visitors alike. All information should be relevant to the project and easy to understand, the information in the Construction Phase Plan will depend on the complexity of the project and the risks that are relevant to the site.

Schedule 3 of CDM15 describes work that is defined as being of particular risk, specific arrangements and procedures are required in such cases to assure a safe working environment during the construction phase. On larger, notifiable projects in is difficult to avoid such high risk activities. It is the responsibility of the Principal Contractor to ensure that all employers, contractors and anyone self-employed follow the Construction Phase Plan.

Identified in the Code of Practice for CDM15 is the information to consider when drawing up Construction Phase Plan. The Code identifies that details of key members of the project team along with anticipated start and completion dates should be made available on site along with the details of how the work will be managed.

Where several contractors interface with each other, cooperation and coordination between all team members is required, arrangements need to be in place for involving workers in the construction phase. Details of the site inductions should be fit for purpose and reflect the stage the project is at the time the induction is carried out, the level of welfare facilities and provision for fire prevention should also be managed in line with the size of project. A project should have specific aims, these aims should be achievable if site rules drawn up in the Plan are followed.

When Do CDM Regulations Apply?

The Construction Design and Management Regulation or CDM has been around now for over 22 years in some shape or form and in that time has been subject to changes along the way.  The most recent revision of the Regulations came into force in April 2015 (CDM15).

The removal of the role of the CDM Co-ordinator to make way for that of the Principal Designer was one of the biggest change to this latest revision.  CDM15 is the legislation that applies to all construction projects, from feasibility study to final handover and beyond.  The CDM Regulations are in place to reduce the risk of harm to those who not only build and maintain structures, but to those that have to use the structure, right up to when the building is demolished.

CDM15 applies to both domestic and commercial building sites, large and small, put simply, unless it is a DIY job, then this law will probably apply as a result. The health and safety responsibilities should be treated as normal a part of the construction process as mixing cement.  No matter what the size of your project, consideration for health and safety should be part of the planning process, not something that is reluctantly snapped on just before the building starts.

It doesn’t have to be about creating mountains of paperwork and unnecessary processes; Safer Sphere can assist with ensuring CDM compliance. We will work together with clients and designers to promote health and safety throughout the project, manage your compliance efficiently, and ensure adequately trained individuals are appointed to propel the project forward. Complying with CDM 2015 does not have to cause you concern, instead, it will help ensure that no-one is harmed during construction and that the structure is safe to use and easy to maintain. Effective planning will also help ensure that your work is well managed with fewer unexpected costs and problems.

Companies that have kept abreast of the changes to the regulations are improving standards within the construction industry all the time. Nearly three years have passed since the requirements of CDM were revised in 2015, and there are companies who have not had the resources available within their own organisation to enjoy the benefits of having competent, professional and holistic Construction Health & Safety Solutions available to them. In addition, many homeowners will still be unaware of the regulations at all, never mind their own responsibilities.

Domestic clients were omitted from the Regulations before the 2015 revisions, since then if a domestic project has more than one contractor working simultaneously, a “Principal Contractor” and “Principal Designer” must be appointed just like on a commercial site.  Size is not important before any project starts, the Principal Designer will be responsible for ensuring the client understands their responsibilities under CDM15 and for preparing and sharing the pre-construction information with the appointed designers and contractors.

The Principal Contractor must prepare a construction phase plan before any physical work begins. The Principal Contractor is also responsible for undertaking worker site inductions, ensuring that adequate welfare and sanitation facilities are provided and securing the site against the public.

 Whether you are having building work carried out on your behalf (client), as a domestic client, Principal Contractor, Designer, Sub-Contractor, appointed as another duty holder, or a site worker, then you will have to consider your health and safety responsibilities under CDM15 before a spade is put in the ground.

In order to comply with this law, projects should be carried out with health and safety in mind.

To discuss any project with Safer Sphere please don’t hesitate to contact us

Is Your Project CDM Compliant?

Is Your Project CDM Compliant?

We pride ourselves on delivering above and beyond the call of the CDM Regulations, our integration with the client project delivery teams and support provided to enable best practice solutions.

Our delivery model ensures a superior service, competent advice and ultimately a project that meets with the very best practices of Construction Health & Safety.

CDM 2015 PROJECT CDM CONSULTANT SERVICES INCLUDE:-

Acting as adviser to the Client in discharging their dutiees including:-

  • Notify the HSE of the project via an online applications.
  • Advise on and or collate the project Pre Construction H&S Information Pack on behalf of the client for issue to the project team.
  • Assist with preparation of and advise the client as to the adequacy of the Construction Phase H&S Plan and welfare facilities developed by the Principal Contractor.
  • Monitoring of Principal Designer and Principal Contractor compliance.
  • Advise on and or collate the project H&S File.

ADDITIONAL SERVICES WHICH A CLIENT MAY ALSO WISH TO CONSIDER:-

  • Stage 1 & Stage 2 Competence Assessments of duty holders against the requirements of PAS 91.
  • PQQ / ITT H&S question setting for framework and or project tender enquiries.
  • Independent Site Inspection and or Safety Audits of operations on site to ensure compliance.
  • Liaison support with the Health & Safety Executive on behalf of the client.
  • Client CDM training to assist client representative in understanding their duties under the CDM Regulations.
  • Preparation of model contract / appointment clauses to hold designers and contractors to their duties and compliance.