CDM News

News from around the UK about CDM Principal Designer related topics.

What is a Principal Designer?

What Is The Role Of Principal Designer?

There are three main roles within the CDM Regulations that have responsibility for health and safety. The Client, The Principal Contractor and the Principal Designer. While the Client has overall responsibility, the Principal Designer and Principal Contractor have responsibilities depending on the phase of the project. CDM15 introduced us to the new role of Principal Designer while saying goodbye to the CDM Coordinator role.

Every project must have a Principal Designer appointed where required in order to meet the requirements of CDM15.
Any client who requires construction or demolition to be carried out, where more than one contractor is involved, has to appoint a Principal Designer before any design or construction work begins. A Principal Designer must be appointed by the Client in writing, but the role and that of others on site and in design do not necessarily have to be mutually exclusive.

Principal Designers have an important role in influencing how risks to health and safety are managed throughout a project. Design decisions made during the pre-construction phase have a significant influence in ensuring the project is delivered in a way that secures the health and safety of everyone affected by the work. Ultimately, the responsibility to appoint a Principal Designer falls on the Client. If a Principal Designer is not appointed, then the role is passed to the Client, which would be a difficult role for many to fulfil.

Non-compliance regarding the appointment of a Principal Designer could result in criminal proceedings, so appointing a competent Principal Designer is important. People who had been CDM Coordinators under CDM07 might not be able to fulfil the role of Principal Designer, although the definition of designer under CDM15 is open to interpretation. If you are not sure about this then contact Safer Sphere for more information on our Client Advisor & Principal Designer Advisor services.

The Principal Designer must have overall control of the pre-construction period (design and planning stage) of a relevant project and be involved in the preparation of project designs and in instructing other specialists and designers. The Principal Designer will have a technical knowledge of the Construction Industry and will know how to apply health and safety to the design process, relevant to the project.

Principal Designer Roles:

  • Advise the client of their duties and assist them with the formulation of the Client CDM Brief.
  • Plan, manage, monitor and coordinate health and safety in the pre-construction phase. In doing so they must take account of relevant information (such as an existing health and safety file or surveys) that might affect design work carried out both before and after the construction phase has started.
  • Ensure other designers comply with their duties
  • Take account of the general Principals of prevention.
  • Help and advise the client in bringing together pre-construction information, and provide the information that designers and contractors need to carry out their duties.
  • Work with any other designers on the project to eliminate foreseeable health and safety risks to anyone affected by the work and, where that is not possible, take steps to reduce or control those risks.
  • Ensure that everyone involved in the pre-construction phase communicates and cooperates, coordinating their work wherever required.
  • Liaise with the Principal Contractor, keeping them informed of any risks that need to be controlled during the construction phase.
  • Identify, eliminate or control foreseeable risks to health and safety during the pre-construction phase
  • Collate and prepare the health and safety file for completion of the project

A Principal Designer will influence the way Health and Safety risks are controlled and how these controls are incorporated into the project overall. During pre-construction, the Principal Designer must plan and manage matters relating to Health and Safety as well as overall monitoring of the project and co-ordinating to ensure that principles of prevention are followed and the project is carried out without risk to health or safety.

Safer Sphere offer a full range of CDM services delivered across the North West and nationally. We can advise and assist on projects of any size.

Is my project notifiable under CDM regs?

Is My Project Notifiable?

Notification of building projects has been a requirement of health and safety law since the 1961 Factories Act, Section 127. This Act was repealed by the 1994 CDM Regulations. Notification became the duty of the CDM Coordinator in the 2007 CDM Regulations and in the 2015 revision of the CDM Regulations, the role of CDM Coordinator was removed and the duty to notify a project became that of the Client. CDM15 applies to all construction projects, irrespective of size, whether they be commercial or domestic construction projects. Some of these projects will be notifiable in writing to the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) before the Construction Phase begins. Relevant information can be supplied to HSE via their online notification portal https://extranet.hse.gov.uk/lfserver/external/f10

Regulation 6 of CDM15 states that a project is notifiable if the construction phase is scheduled to:
Last longer than 30 working days, and has more than 20 workers on site at any one time; and or
Last longer than 500 person days.

A person day is one individual site worker, including plant operators and labourers, who carries out construction work for one normal working shift, supervisors, managers and specialist workers, who may not be directly involved in the construction process, operating plant or carrying out manual work, all must be included as a person day. A working shift is any part of the day on which construction work takes place, even if construction work is carried out for a short part of that day, the whole day counts towards the person day tally during the Construction Phase. Working days include any work carried out on weekends and bank holidays.

Before CDM15, notification was the responsibility of the CDM Coordinator, notification triggering the need for a Principal Contractor & CDM Coordinator to be appointed, this is no longer the case. Where previously connected, appointment and notification processes are now divorced from one another, the client is accountable for their actions irrespective of who carries out the duties on the clients behalf.

Notification under CDM15 is the client’s responsibility, although it is common practice for the client to commission a competent professional to execute this responsibility on behalf of them. The duty remains with the client although where the client is domestic, the responsibility for notification is passed to the Contractor or Principal Contractor where more than one contractor is present including sub-contractors. Safer Sphere can provide this service as part of our Client CDM Support, gathering all the information required for notification and completing the necessary documentation to comply with CDM15 Regulation 6 and CDM15 Schedule 1, details of which are provided below.

1. The date of forwarding the notice.
2. The address of the construction site or precise description of its location.
3. The name of the local authority where the construction site is located.
4. A brief description of the project and the construction work that it entails.
5. The following contact details of the client: name, address, telephone number and (if available) an email address.
6. The following contact details of the principal designer: name, address, telephone number and (if available) an email address.
7. The following contact details of the principal contractor: name, address, telephone number and (if available) an email address.
8. The date planned for the start of the construction phase.
9. The time allocated by the client under regulation 4(1) for the construction work.
10. The planned duration of the construction phase.
11. The estimated maximum number of people at work on the construction site.
12. The planned number of contractors on the construction site.
13. The name and address of any contractor already appointed.
14. The name and address of any designer already appointed.
15. A declaration signed by or on behalf of the client that the client is aware of the client duties under these Regulations.

To be legally compliant, notification, once completed and updated as necessary, should be clearly displayed in the site office where anyone involved in the construction phase can have access to it.

Safer Sphere offer a full range of CDM services across the North West for construction projects of all sizes.

construction phase plan

What is in a construction phase plan?

A Construction Phase Plan is required for every construction project. When appointed by a client, this plan is provided by the contractor, or, where there is more than one contractor, the Principal Contractor, before the construction phase begins. It should be displayed clearly and should be made available to site workers or any visitors. It is created from the information provided by the client during the pre-construction stage and includes any information provided by the Principal Designer.

When implemented, it should go through several revisions throughout the life of a construction project. As time progresses during the construction phase, this health and safety plan will change. A Construction Phase Plan is a legal requirement as part of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015 (CDM 2015), even if you work for a domestic client and even if there is only one contractor on site, the plan must remain up to date and valid. The project may even need to be notified to the HSE, if it is will last 500 person days or 30 working days with more than 20 operatives. Safer Sphere can advise you on preparing and managing this aspect through the construction phase.

The significant hazards on a construction site can be many and varied, it is a legal requirement that all workers on site are told about these hazards and how the hazards are being controlled, the Construction Phase Plan is how the information is initially communicated to sub-contractors, workers and visitors alike. All information should be relevant to the project and easy to understand, the information in the Construction Phase Plan will depend on the complexity of the project and the risks that are relevant to the site.

Schedule 3 of CDM15 describes work that is defined as being of particular risk, specific arrangements and procedures are required in such cases to assure a safe working environment during the construction phase. On larger, notifiable projects in is difficult to avoid such high risk activities. It is the responsibility of the Principal Contractor to ensure that all employers, contractors and anyone self-employed follow the Construction Phase Plan.

Identified in the Code of Practice for CDM15 is the information to consider when drawing up Construction Phase Plan. The Code identifies that details of key members of the project team along with anticipated start and completion dates should be made available on site along with the details of how the work will be managed.

Where several contractors interface with each other, cooperation and coordination between all team members is required, arrangements need to be in place for involving workers in the construction phase. Details of the site inductions should be fit for purpose and reflect the stage the project is at the time the induction is carried out, the level of welfare facilities and provision for fire prevention should also be managed in line with the size of project. A project should have specific aims, these aims should be achievable if site rules drawn up in the Plan are followed.

When Do CDM Regulations Apply?

The Construction Design and Management Regulation or CDM has been around now for over 22 years in some shape or form and in that time has been subject to changes along the way.  The most recent revision of the Regulations came into force in April 2015 (CDM15).

The removal of the role of the CDM Co-ordinator to make way for that of the Principal Designer was one of the biggest change to this latest revision.  CDM15 is the legislation that applies to all construction projects, from feasibility study to final handover and beyond.  The CDM Regulations are in place to reduce the risk of harm to those who not only build and maintain structures, but also those that have to use the structure, right up to when the building is demolished.

CDM15 applies to both domestic and commercial building sites, large and small, put simply, unless it is a DIY job, then this law will probably apply as a result. The health and safety responsibilities should be treated as normal a part of the construction process as mixing cement.  No matter what the size of your project, consideration for health and safety should be part of the planning process not something that is a reluctantly snapped on just before the building starts.

It doesn’t have to be about creating mountains of paperwork and unnecessary processes, Safer Sphere can assist with ensuring CDM compliance. They will work together with clients and designers to promote health and safety throughout the project, manage your compliance efficiently, and ensure adequately trained individuals are appointed to propel the project forward. Complying with CDM 2015 does no have to cause you concern, instead it will help ensure that no-one is harmed during construction and that the structure is safe to use and easy to maintain. Effective planning will also help ensure that your work is well managed with fewer unexpected costs and problems.

Companies that have kept abreast of the changes to the regulations are improving standards within the construction industry all the time. Two years have passed since the requirements of CDM were revised in 2015 and there are companies who have not had the resources available within their own organisation to enjoy the benefits of having competent, professional and holistic Construction Health & Safety Solutions available to them. In addition many home owners will still be unaware of the regulations at all, never mind their own responsibilities.

Domestic clients were omitted from the Regulations before the 2015 revisions, since then, if a domestic project has more than one contractor working simultaneously, a “Principal Contractor” and “Principle  Designer” must be appointed just like on a commercial site.  Size is not important, before any project starts, the Principle Designer will be responsible for ensuring the client understands their responsibilities under CDM15 and for preparing and sharing the pre-construction information with the appointed designers and contractors.

The Principal contractor must prepare a construction phase plan before any physical work begins. The Principle Contractor is also responsible for undertaking worker site inductions, ensuring that adequate welfare and sanitation facilities are provided and securing the site against the public.

 Whether you are having building work carried out on your behalf (client), even as a domestic client, or have been appointed as another  duty holder: Principal contractor, designer, sub-contractor or the humble worker, then you will have to consider your health and safety responsibilities under CDM15 before a shovel is put in the ground, the do’s and don’ts of construction.  In order to comply with this law, projects should be carried out with health and safety in mind.

To discuss any project with Safer Sphere please don’t hesitate to contact us

Is Your Project CDM Compliant?

Is Your Project CDM Compliant?

We pride ourselves on delivering above and beyond the call of the CDM Regulations, our integration with the client project delivery teams and support provided to enable best practice solutions.

Our delivery model ensures a superior service, competent advice and ultimately a project that meets with the very best practices of Construction Health & Safety.

CDM 2015 PROJECT CDM CONSULTANT SERVICES INCLUDE:-

Acting as adviser to the Client in discharging their dutiees including:-

  • Notify the HSE of the project via an online applications.
  • Advise on and or collate the project Pre Construction H&S Information Pack on behalf of the client for issue to the project team.
  • Assist with preparation of and advise the client as to the adequacy of the Construction Phase H&S Plan and welfare facilities developed by the Principal Contractor.
  • Monitoring of Principal Designer and Principal Contractor compliance.
  • Advise on and or collate the project H&S File.

ADDITIONAL SERVICES WHICH A CLIENT MAY ALSO WISH TO CONSIDER:-

  • Stage 1 & Stage 2 Competence Assessments of duty holders against the requirements of PAS 91.
  • PQQ / ITT H&S question setting for framework and or project tender enquiries.
  • Independent Site Inspection and or Safety Audits of operations on site to ensure compliance.
  • Liaison support with the Health & Safety Executive on behalf of the client.
  • Client CDM training to assist client representative in understanding their duties under the CDM Regulations.
  • Preparation of model contract / appointment clauses to hold designers and contractors to their duties and compliance.

Firm fined £550,000 after two men fall to their deaths

Firm fined £550,000 after two men fall to their deaths

A north London building firm has been fined £550,000 after two men fell 4m to their deaths when a site perimeter hoarding gave way in the Capital.

CCTV footage showed the two men, both in their early thirties, grappling before one pushed the other against the site hoarding, which gave way, leading them to topple head first into the basement of a residential site near Euston Station back in October 2013.

Both men suffered catastrophic head and neck injuries, the Old Bailey was told.

The firm was fined £250,000 each for the deaths as well as £50,000 for the heath and safety breach. It was also ordered to pay £23,653 costs.

View Article by Construction Enquirer here

Safer Sphere advise, hoardings should alway be a part of your temporary works processes and designed by a competent person.

Steve Murray elected Chairman of Merseyside Chapter ICWCI

Steve Murray elected Chairman of Merseyside Chapter ICWCI

Safer Sphere are proud to announce one of our CDM Consultants Steve Murray has been appointed as Chair of the Institute of Clerk of Works and Construction Inspectorate, Merseyside Chapter.

Join the ICWCI and you will become part of a professionally recognised organisation, dedicated to the promotion and projection of those involved in site inspection.

The Institute has a long established, highly recognised status within the construction industry, and the designations LICWCI, MICWCI and FICWCI are accepted as the benchmark of professional recognition and standing.

 

Click here to go to the ICWCI Website

Click here to view the benefits of ICWCI Membership

IOSH’s No Time to Lose

About IOSH’s campaign

IOSH’s No Time to Lose campaign aims to get carcinogenic exposure issues more widely understood and help businesses take action. The campaign is working to:

  • raise awareness of a significant health issue facing workers in the UK and internationally
  • suggest some solutions on a UK scale to tackle the problem – a national model that can be transposed internationally
  • offer free practical, original materials to businesses to help them deliver effective prevention programmes.

About work cancer

Cancer caused by what people do at work is nothing new. One of the first official cases of an occupational cancer was identified in the eighteenth century.

Asbestos is the best known carcinogen – and the biggest killer. Today, asbestos claims well over 100,000 lives a year worldwide. It’s estimated that 10 million people across the world will have died as a result of asbestos exposure before it’s been fully controlled. But there are many other carcinogenic exposures that cause cancer and claim lives – well over 50 substances are listed as known or probable causes of workplace cancer. Across the EU, 1 in 5 workers faces an occupational cancer risk. Across the world, the number of people dying from a work-caused cancer far outstrips those dying because of work accidents. It’s estimated that at least 666,000 people die worldwide every year.

 

Go to the campaign website here.

 

A new health and safety system strategy

A new health and safety system strategy

HSE publish their new strategy – Helping Great Britain work well

The six strategic themes are;

  • Acting together: Promoting broader ownership of health and safety in Great Britain.
  • Tackling ill health: Highlighting and tackling the costs of work-related ill health.
  • Managing risk well: Simplifying risk management and helping business to grow.
  • Supporting small employers: Giving SMEs simple advice so they know what they have to do.
  • Keeping pace with change: Anticipating and tackling new health and safety challenges.
  • Sharing our success: Promoting the bene ts of Great Britain’s world-class health and safety system.

These strategic themes were discussed with key players – representing all sectors and organisations with an interest in health and safety – during a nationwide engagement programme in January and February 2016.

You can follow the campaign on Twitter – #HelpGBWorkWell

You can download the document HelpGBWorkWell here. and get more information here.