Monthly Archives - November 2018

CDM, Safer Sphere, 100 Barbirolli Square, Manchester

Safer Sphere appointed on 100 Barbirolli Square

Safer Sphere will be supporting 5Plus Architects in the role of Principal Designer Advisor on the refurbishment of 100 Barbirolli Square in Manchester. The appointment comes off the back of the success of the recent refurbishment of 101 Barbirolli Square where we also supported 5Plus Architects on the project.

The proposals include reconfiguring the existing entrance and reception area to include a new tenant hub with coffee bar offer; converting a level of  the basement car park into a new office floor, reconfiguring the atrium and dropping the atrium floor down a level, creating a large cycle hub with changing rooms accessed directly from the street and at roof level extending the top floor office whilst creating two roof terraces. The design increases the office space to circa 150,000 ft2.

The scheme has now been submitted for planning and work will start on site in 2019 with completion in 2020.

Protecting the public under CDM15 regulations

Protecting the Public under CDM 2015

The Construction (Design & Management) Regulations (CDM 2015) are the primary set of rules governing construction projects. It applies to all construction and building work and includes every type of project from new build and conversions to refurbishment and demolition.

Part of the law requires those in charge of construction projects to carry out operations without posing a danger to the public. This includes other workers who can potentially be affected by the construction work.

According to HSE inspector David Kirkpatrick, construction companies must make it a priority to secure their construction sites to prevent access by unauthorised parties. These sites can be full of hazards that vulnerable people such as children may not be able to fully understand.

Under CDM 2015, the project client should provide all necessary information about the following particulars:

  • Site boundaries
  • Usage of land bordering the construction site
  • Site access
  • Steps to prevent unauthorised parties from accessing the site

This information will guide the measures taken by contractors. Key issues that need to be addressed are:

  • Managing access to the site
  • Any hazards that could present a danger to the public
  • Vulnerable groups that may be affected

All construction sites must have:

  • Defined measures to manage access across designated boundaries and,
  • Steps to prevent unauthorised people from gaining access to the work site

While there has been a decline in the numbers of children being injured or killed on construction sites, complacency must be avoided. Two or three children die every year after accessing building sites, and many more are seriously injured.

It’s not just children who are at risk but also other members of the public, such as passers-by, can be injured by:

  • Tools or materials that fall outside the boundaries of the job site
  • Tripping and falling into trenches
  • Being hit by moving construction vehicles

For maximum efficacy, the pre-construction information from the client should include:

  • All project boundaries
  • Information about adjacent land use
  • Access information
  • Measures to keep unauthorised people out

To manage site access, the following are required.

Site Boundaries

To manage public risk, boundaries must be defined by suitable fencing. The fence type should be consistent with the type of site and the surroundings. Contractors need to determine what the perimetre will consist of, supply the fencing, and maintain it once erected.

Questions that contractors must ask themselves include:

  • What is the type and nature of the construction work being performed
  • How heavily populated is the area?
  • Who will need to visit the site while work is being carried out?
  • Will children be attracted to the site?
  • What are the characteristics of the site? For example, location, proximity to other buildings, current site boundaries.

In populated areas, this will typically mean a mesh fence around two metres high or hoarding around the construction site.

Authorisation

The primary contractor must take adequate measures to prevent unauthorised parties from accessing the site.

  • People may be restricted to certain areas or authorised to access the entire site.
  • The contractor must explain applicable site rules to authorised parties and perform any required induction.
  • They may have to accompany or supervise some authorised parties while on site or accessing certain areas.

Hazards that Present a Risk to the Public

Many construction site hazards present a risk to visitors and the general public. Contractors must consider if they exist on a certain project and, if so, how they will manage them.

  • Falling objects: Objects must not be able to fall outside the site boundaries. Contractors may have to use brick guards, netting, toe-boards, fans, and covered walkways.
  • Site vehicles. Contractors must ensure that pedestrians cannot be hit by vehicles entering or leaving the site.
  • Access equipment. Measures must be taken to prevent people outside the site boundary from being hit while scaffolding and other access equipment is being erected, used, and dismantled.
  • Stacking and storing materials. Reduce the risks associated with storing materials by storing them within the perimetre of the site, ideally in a secure location or away from the fencing.
  • Excavations and openings. People can be hurt if they fall into excavati9ns, stairwells, and other open areas.
  • Other hazards include road works, slips, trips, and falls in pedestrian areas, hazardous substances, plant equipment and machinery, dust, noise, and vibration, and energy sources such as electricity.

Vulnerable Groups

Children, the elderly, and people with certain disabilities may need special consideration, especially if work is being done in locations like hospitals and schools.

Children can be attracted to construction sites as potential play areas. Constractors must take all reasonable steps to keep them from accessing the site and endangering themselves.

The steps below are especially important for child safety:

  • When work is finished for the day, secure the site thoroughly
  • Cover or erect barriers around pits and excavations
  • Immobilise vehicles and lock them away if possible
  • Store building materials such as cement bags, manhole rings, and pipes so that they cannot tip or roll over
  • Remove access ladders from scaffolds and excavations
  • Make sure that all hazardous substances are locked away

Safer Sphere are able to advise on any aspect of CDM 2015.

Have a question?

If you would like to speak to us about any of our CDM services, then our team would be happy to help.

Principal Designer Advisor,Safer Sphere, Tolworth, Lidl

Safer Sphere appointed on new Lidl headquarters

Safer Sphere is proud to be supporting UMC Architects and Winvic who have secured the contract to build a new UK headquarters in Tolworth for LIDL.

The 250,000 sq. ft. building will be just five miles from LIDL’s current HQ in Wimbledon and is expected to take two years to complete. We have been appointed as Principal Designer Advisor on the project and we look forward to working with the team and seeing the build progress.

Pride of St Helens Business Awards, Small Business of the Year, CDM, Consultants, St Helens, Health and Safety, Awards

Safer Sphere scoops Small Business of the Year award

Construction Health and Safety specialists Safer Sphere has taken home the award for ‘Small Business of the Year’ at this year’s Pride of St Helens Business Awards. This comes fresh off the back of the company’s win at the National Association for Project Safety (APS) awards where the business was crowned CDM Consultant of the year.

The Pride of St Helens Business Awards are a celebration of local businesses and what theses business bring to the town.

Mike Forsyth, Managing Director, Safer Sphere said “We were pleased to have made the final but to take home the award, in what I feel was a very strong category is an amazing achievement. The awards night had so many fantastic businesses from the local area and really highlights the positive impact that these businesses bring to the town and the local economy. All our team are either from St Helens or the surrounding area and this recognition of our business is down to them and the hard work they put in. It was a proud moment to accept this award and we will continue to earn this title by providing the best expert service by the best team.”

Health and Safety, CDM, Principal Designer Advisor

Safer Sphere appointed on Royal Blackburn Hospital

Safer Sphere continues to provide health and safety support on another hospital project for ENGIE. We have been appointed on the refurbishment of two critical care units at the Royal Blackburn Hospital. The scope of works consists of the repainting of the wards, replacement of the floors, replacement of damaged wall protection and replacement of all ceiling tiles. We will be acting as Prinicpal Designer Advisor on the project.