Monthly Archives - August 2018

Angel Meadows, Manchester, Health and Safety, Principal Designer Advisor, CDM

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 4

The excavation continues, and things are progressing steadily on the site. On Ludgate Hill (Plot 5), the first half of the excavation has been backfilled and work is underway to excavate the second half. This should reveal a continuation of the ‘Back of Old Mount St’ cobbles and the properties that bordered them.

Down on Mincing St (Plot 3), the team are busy manually cleaning the various cellars and pavements that have unearthed, along with an almost complete section of ‘Holden St’ (see the previous blog post). Unfortunately, Plot 3 seems to be the most impacted by modern disturbance, particularly on the western side of the site where the archaeology has been damaged if not removed entirely. Despite this, Oxford Archaeology has made great progress with the cellars of the ‘Derby Arms’ pub in the southwest corner of the plot, where they seem to have uncovered a lot of evidence for reshaping and remodelling with plenty of mismatched brickwork indicating where rooms have been altered from their original layout.

Unfortunately, there has not been hoards of bottles and barrels that the team were hoping for (nor a scuttler in sight), but a few interesting finds have turned up. These finds include; advertising signs for cocoa and an aniline dye manufacturer, a mixture of different bottles and vials possibly relating to medicine, shoes, and part of what may be a pram frame. These finds are true parts of history and have really spurred the team despite the sudden downpours and gloomy skies as the weather has taken a turn from when the dig began.

The Oxford Archaeology team have worked really hard in some tough weather conditions, but their enthusiasm and dedication has not once faltered. The team will be recording the findings and will be moving onto the next plots in the next week or so where they hope to unearth more parts of Manchester’s historic ruins

Safer Sphere is acting as Principal Designer Advisor and CDM Client Advisor for the Angel Meadows development.

Angel Meadows, CDM, Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safety

Cocoa Sign

Angel Meadows, CDM, Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safety

Angel Meadows Street Remains

Angel Meadows, CDM, Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor, Health and Safety

Aniline Dye Manufacturer Sign

Angel Meadows, Principal Designer Advisor, CDM, Health and Safety,

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 3

The excavation of Angel Meadows continues, and the team began with the backfilling of Plot 2 on Mincing Street, with the recording completed it was time to fill in the cellars and level off the ground to allow the opening the adjacent Plot 3. According to the historic mapping, Plot 3 contains a similar layout of buildings, centred around courtyards, as we have previously seen elsewhere, with two notable differences; the first is the presence of a named street and the second is that one of the buildings used to be a pub.

The name ‘Holden Street’ appears on our earliest available map of 1831 and is still named as such on the OS map of 1966, although it’s width does appear to fluctuate throughout history and it’s likely no more than a back street in later incarnations (it is not named at all on some of the early 20th Century maps). The excavation has already revealed an area of cobbles in line with where Holden Street should lie, so we should learn quite quickly the extent to which it survives.

Our pub is located in the southwest corner of Plot 3 and is first noted on the OS map of 1850. This initial reference names it as ‘The Derby Arms’ and while later mapping is not as specific, the site is still annotated as a public house on the 1922 edition. The machine excavation is still ongoing and at the time of writing we haven’t broken ground in that part of the site yet, but the team are anticipating a nice big cellar with (hopefully) some lovely old bottles. The excavation of a scuttler gang hideout (as pubs often were) may be wishful thinking, as the building seemingly outlasted the youth gangs. The activities of such gangs had begun to tail off by the turn of the 20th century due to a combination of; increased policing, the implementation of working Lads’ Clubs and the outbreak of the Boer War, and later, the First World War. That being said, a pub is an excellent motivator for archaeologists and not the one the team attend as a reward at the end of the working day!

Over on Ludgate Hill (Plot 5) the team worked very hard to finish the cleaning and have jumped straight onto the recording with another visit from our drone pilot scheduled in order to complete the necessary survey work. With everything running to plan the next stage will be to continue backfilling sometime next week, and after that, opening up the other half to continue the story.

Angel Meadows, Principal Designer Advisor Manchester, CDM, Health and Safety

Principal Designer Advisor Liverpool, Edward Pavillion

Safer Sphere appointed on Grade 1 listed Edward Pavilion

We are pleased to be working on the fit-out of the Grade 1 listed Edward Pavilion in Liverpool with Ardmac on behalf of CastleForge Partners. We will be acting as Principal Designer Advisor to Ardmac on the project which will see work carried out across 4 Floors of the building.

Safer Sphere appointed of Schools project just in time for half term

We are pleased to have been appointed on a remedial works project for various schools across Liverpool and Knowsley. We will be acting as Principal Designer Advisor to Engie on the project as well as providing a CDM Training support to the Engie team.

Jewellers, CDM Manchester, Principal Designer Advisor

Safer Sphere appointed on fit-out of prestigious Manchester jewellers

We are delighted to have been appointed as Principal Designer Advisor by 5 Plus Architects fit-out of the prestigious David M Robinson jewellers on St Ann’s Square, Manchester.

David M Robinson (DMR) has traded in the city for almost 40 years and is now expanding its showroom on the corner of St Ann’s Square into the retail unit next door which will create a Rolex VIP room and private lounge.

The project is due to be completed this Autumn.

CDM Client Advisor, Principal Designer Advisor Leeds

Safer Sphere appointed on Royds High School works

Safer Sphere has been appointed on upgrades and maintenance projects at Royds High School, a Leeds City Council school. Safer Sphere will be acting as CDM Client Advisor and Principal Designer Advisor supporting Interserve on the project.

CDM Advisors Leeds

Safer Sphere continue to support Dandara PRS Scheme as CDM Advisors

Safer Sphere was originally appointed as CDM Coordinators by Dandara on a 3500 unit PRS at 5 locations throughout the UK. Under CDM 2015 the role evolved into Client CDM Advisors and Principal Designer Advisors and we have continued to support the project through the building stage. Safer Sphere has now been appointed Principal Designer Advisors and Client Advisors on the Sweet Street and Chapel Wharf fit-out. It will be fantastic for us to see a project through from start to finish and the development and fit-out are due to be completed in 2019.

Angel Meadows, Manchester, CDM, Health and Safety, Principal Designer Advisor

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 2

The Angel Meadows excavation has entered its second week and the team are hard at work finishing the cleaning of the archaeology on Plot 2 (Mincing Street), and the process of recording has started with the completion of a GPS survey and extensive photography. This will be completed later this week with the use of a drone to accurately survey the remains. Cleaning of the structural remains is now being undertaken on Plot 5 (Ludgate Hill), to properly define the features our excavations have revealed there.

Preliminary comparisons between the Plot 2 site and historic mapping are allowing the team to begin the work of understanding how the layout of the dwellings in the area changed over time. The documents available to us show buildings were remodelled and removed, courtyards and alleys were extended, and points of access were changed over a period of 100 years. Evidence can be seen of this on the ground existing in the form of blocked doorways, truncated walls, and areas of more recent building superimposed over older foundations. The reasons for these changes isn’t always immediately clear, but some may relate to the efforts of the social reformers who during the later part of the nineteenth century, were (rightfully) concerned that the dark, squalid, and utterly unsanitary, cramped conditions of the area were contributing to the spread of disease and crime and high mortality rates.

Perhaps the most significant indication of these changes is the addition of later sanitation works. These took the form of proper drainage and toilet blocks, much-needed facilities in ‘The Meadow’ and a response to legislation introduced in the mid-1800’s, making such facilities a legal requirement for existing housing, as well as new buildings. In several examples on site, later structures can be seen and have been built onto and over the old to incorporate these amenities.

It’s a strange thing to portray lavatories as a ‘highlight’ of an archaeological site, but the implementation of basic plumbing is representative of the wider initiative to improve conditions for the working classes in Angel Meadow during the Industrial period. It will be interesting to see what other evidence of the conditions will be found and what the excavation further reveals.

CDM, Angel Meadows, Manchester, Health and Safety

CDM Contractor Duties Advice

Further Duties For The Contractor To Comply With CDM15 Regulations

In previous articles we have considered the duty of the Contractor under CDM15 and the role of the Contractor; the duty to manage the work safely, how a Contractor may check the competency of workers on the project team, safety with tools, equipment and materials and any information and instruction that is passed to the contractor from the Pre-Construction Phase or during the Construction Phase of the project.

It must be remembered that the flow of information will be two way and the Contractor must keep the Construction Phase Plan up to date and expect that the Principal Contractor manage the Plan similarly.

Here we are going to delve deeper into the requirements for consultation and co-operation with other duty holders.

How Contractors can consult with Employees

There must be collaboration between Contractors as employer and the workers that are on task to get individuals to work safely. Involving workers in the decision making process with regards health and safety tends to lead to practical solutions, practical solutions that increase the potential commitment and buy in from workers to any Health and Safety topics.

Practical solutions are more easily fostered by the workforce, practical solutions generally come from speaking to workers about their experience and knowledge about a task or job. When experienced workers are consulted on matters of health and safety, it will be easier to spot workplace hazards and to implement realistic controls that will not be seen as a burden or barrier to completing a task to programme.

Consultation is a proven means of managing Health and Safety on construction projects. Consultation is not only about employers giving information to workers that is part of the Construction Phase Plan, but also requires the Contractor as an employer to listen to workers and consider their experience in the field and previous issues that they have come up against in similar situations.

Consultation with the work force should cover the hazards associated from their own work and the work of others working on the project as well as those environmental risks that modern construction techniques may harbour, the way these risks are managed and how information and training to protect workers from relevant risks should be discussed at length.

Preparing the Construction Phase Plan

Preparing the Construction Phase Plan is the responsibility of the Principal Contractor where more than one Contractor is present on site. In situations where there is only one Contractor, the Construction Phase Plan cannot be left up to another contractor as there is essentially no one to pass this duty to.

A Construction Phase Plan describes how health and safety will be managed during construction and will contain information that is relevant to all Contractors working on the project. The Construction Phase Plan should be available to anyone who wants to see it and therefore the information contained in it should be clear and easily understood with all superfluous information removed. Issues such as logistics, working at height, hazardous substances, demolition and groundworks should all be considered and included in the Construction Phase Plan if the works include it.

Before any site is set up or work begins in the Construction Phase, the Plan should be developed. While it is the duty of the [Principal] Contractor to develop the Construction Phase Plan, it is the responsibility of the Client to ensure that the Construction Phase Plan is in place before the work begins.

 

Providing Welfare Facilities

Welfare includes the provision of toilets, both lit and ventilated and suitable for both sexes. With more and more female staff working on Construction sites, male and female toilets are thankfully becoming more common, but are open to abuse if not managed correctly. Washing facilities with hot and cold water, soap or skin detergent with a means of drying hands should be close to the toilet facility. Separately, but just as important are rest facilities, a room with tables and chairs with drinking water and cups is a bare minimum.

Where workers will need to change clothes or dry their workwear, a separate changing/drying room with lockers should be provided. It should be noted that while the lockers should be provided by the [Principal] Contractor, it is commonly the responsibility of the Contractor to supply their own key and lock.

The supply of Welfare Facilities is part of CDM15. Where one Contractor is charged with a Construction Project, the Welfare Facilities should be suitable and sufficient for the size of the project and should be available from when construction starts until the end of the project. Were more than one contractor is working on a project, it is the Principal Contractor who is ultimately responsible for ensuring that welfare facilities are provided.

It is the Clients responsibility to ensure that suitable arrangements are provided for workers welfare by the Principal Contractor.

Providing a Site Induction

Suitable site inductions should be provided by the [Principal] Contractor, this may be in groups or given to individuals as they start work. Where there is only one Contractor on site, Site Inductions are still a necessary part of the Construction Phase and should cover all the health and safety risks associated with the site. While each Site Induction will differ from project to project, typical topics that should be covered may be:

  1. The Commitment to Health and Safety by the Contractor
  2. Basic details of the project and the anticipated outcome
  3. What is the management structure on the site – who are the relevant contacts within the organisation
  4. What are site specific health and safety risks (overhead electricity, trees on site, watercourses nearly, railways etc)
  5. How will health and safety on site be controlled via site rule, how will pedestrians and vehicles be segregated, what is the minimum PPE standard, how will deliveries to site be managed, how will temporary electricity be provided, how will hazardous substances be stored)
  6. What are the procedures for accidents and who is responsible for first aid
  7. How are accidents on site recorded and how will RIDDOR events be reported to HSE
  8. When and what will be the subjects of training, toolbox task and task briefings.
  9. How will the workforce be consulted with
  10. What is each individual’s responsibility for health and safety while on site.

Safer Sphere appreciates that the CDM Regulations 2015 and Health and Safety Legislation can be a burden to small and medium-sized contractors. Such organisations rarely have the resource to employ internal Health and Safety professionals, meaning the burden is applied to those managing the organisation or supervising construction activities.

Our aim in this department is to reduce that burden by providing compliant Contractor CDM Support, which enables contractors to make Health and Safety a simple process and gives them the ability to concentrate their efforts in providing quality and cost-effective solutions in their chosen field. Whether you are a “contractor” or acting as “Principal Contractor”, Safer Sphere are here to help you!

Angel Meadows, Manchester, CDM, Health and Safety, Principal Designer Advisor

Angel Meadows Archaeological Excavation – Part 1

Safer Sphere has been working with Far East Consortium on the Angel Meadows development since the beginning of the project as Principal Designer Advisor and CDM Client Advisor and before work commences, it was decided that an archaeological excavation should take place to ensure that this historic site is clear before any building works commences.

Orion Heritage and Oxford Archaeology have teamed up and the dig is now underway. Safer Sphere will be posting a series of blogs and updates as they see what lies beneath.

Update 1 – 02/08/18

If you’ve been in the vicinity of St Michael’s Flags and Angel Meadow in the last couple of weeks you will have noticed work has begun in earnest on plots 2 and 5 of the Meadowside development. The tarmac and concrete of the car parks have been lifted and the Oxford Archaeology North team have been busy overseeing the excavation of the site to reveal the hidden remains of the worker’s housing.

Plot 2, alongside Dantzic Street, is turning up some of the infamous cellars alongside nicely preserved courtyard areas and potentially an outhouse or two. While on the other side of the park, on Plot 5 we have even more cellar rooms and the cobbled remains of a minor street indicated on the OS maps of 1850 as Back of Old Mount Street.

Over the next couple of weeks, the OAN team will be beavering away cleaning off the walls and floors in these areas so they can be photographed and surveyed, recording the detail of life in Manchester’s industrial past.

If you’d like to take a closer look at some of these discoveries and talk to members of the team, open days will be planned in the coming weeks. Keep your eyes peeled on our website and Social Media for the next planned tour.

Angel Meadows, Manchester, Health and Safety